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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
this is only my 2nd year using an extractor and last year i used a bread knife to uncap. this year i got a new electric knife for fathers day and just put it to use.

Is it common to have the knife actually ''re-seal'' the combs after passing over them? As i slice off the cappings i'm often getting a thin film of melted wax forming over the tops of the cells. Some times the wax will pop open when extracting, but most i had to open up with a capping scratcher.

It seems like maybe it's getting too hot, but the knife has no heat adjustment. it's plugged into a power strip with an on/off switch and i turn off the knife after each comb while i'm loading the extractor and getting the next comb ready.
 

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I never liked those electric knives myself, I just use a plain unheated serrated uncapping knife, I make sure the combs of honey are warm (at least 90 degrees) and the knife cuts off the cappings just as fast as the electric knife would. Any low spots I get with the cappings scratcher. You can put the plain knife in hot water between frames to heat it a bit also, I don't do it because you would introduce drops of water into your honey which you don't want to do, unless of course you take the time to dry off the knife first, which takes even more time. An idea might be to set the knife down underneath a heat lamp between combs. Just some thoughts. John
 

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yes I was just like you ,back when we did not have electric knives, yours must have an ajustment on it and set the temperture at a level that helps in cutting the wax not melting it play with it until you get it the way you like the way it cuts. after you get it ajusted you will like it, oh another thing hold the knife at a 33 degrees so the cutting eadge is all that touches the wax. play with it and soon you will master it. good luck rock.
 

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With the non-adjustable knives you're pretty much restricted to uncapping at the speed the knife dictates. It really helps to hold the frame at an angle, leaning into the knife, instead of straight up and down. That way the cappings fall away from the frame instead of just rolling down the frame and getting in the way. You can uncap from either end also; don't have to start at the top and work down. Practice and see which way works best for you.
 

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I doubt that it is too hot, because my new knife has heat adjustment on it. I thought it was not hot enough where I had it set so I turned it wide open. BAD MOVE. It began to scorch and stink, and smoke. I spent an hour scraping and washing it. After turning it back down it woeked just fine. I would say what that's been posted already. You will get used to it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
i tried leaving it on longer to make it hotter. i tried slowly slicing. i tried plowing through as fast as i could. different angles. it came from brushy mtn... so i'm sure it's not the knife. sure is a pain tho
 

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badcreek; when I was in the service I was shipped to montana, I could not ride anything horse, bull cow or anything but before I left I rode bull in the rodeo. you will get the hang of it. good luck rock!
 
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