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Discussion Starter #1
Would a strong hive fill this frame out if I place it in the middle and feed them? I have about 10 of these sitting around and dont know if they are worth keeping. Thanks for any advice. IMG_0877.jpg
 

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I'll second the yes, i would scrape it all the way down and then add a coating of wax, the bees won't care what it actually looks like if it's usable.
 

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I'd scrape it clean of loose and foul debris. If it still wasn't looking good, a quick scrub-down with water and a brush will tidy things up nicely. You have less than a dozen of them so that won't take more than fifteen minutes. (Bucket of warm water, outside, and a sturdy scrub brush is all you'll need.) Then recoat them with melted wax.

Why allow the bees to invest the time and effort involved in drawing fresh wax over a less than great substrate, when a minor amount of your effort will fix it? High quality drawn comb is the most valuable resource in a hive, both to the bees and the beekeeper.

Nancy
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Last year I was given around thirty plastic foundation frames that the wax moths had gotten into. They looked real bad. After scraping and a soak in some hot water with bleach, they cleaned up pretty nice and most of them got drawn out last summer. Still have a few the bees did not take to, so they will get rewaxed this spring. I use an Igloo cooler to soak the frames in. It will hold 10 deep frames at a time.
 

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One of the best things that plastic foundation has going for it is that you can re-wax it and be good to go. That and the amount of support it offers when extracting, in comparison to the time involved in wiring wax foundation.
 

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Like they all said... clean it and rewax it.
 

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Last year I was given around thirty plastic foundation frames that the wax moths had gotten into. They looked real bad. After scraping and a soak in some hot water with bleach, they cleaned up pretty nice and most of them got drawn out last summer. Still have a few the bees did not take to, so they will get rewaxed this spring. I use an Igloo cooler to soak the frames in. It will hold 10 deep frames at a time.
I GAVE Odfrank a whole case of new plastic foundation PRE-WAXED and all he did was complain about them! :scratch:
 

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No.....you gave me plastic frames that you knew are a brace comb nitemare. I have marked and followed old rewaxed Ritecell and I will gladly accept that. And there is already a thread on that frame subject. You are boring the BS members by repeating subjects due to your senility.

QUOTE=Charlie B;1693247]
Last year I was given around thirty plastic foundation frames that the wax moths had gotten into. They looked real bad. After scraping and a soak in some hot water with bleach, they cleaned up pretty nice and most of them got drawn out last summer. Still have a few the bees did not take to, so they will get rewaxed this spring. I use an Igloo cooler to soak the frames in. It will hold 10 deep frames at a time.
I GAVE Odfrank a whole case of new plastic foundation PRE-WAXED and all he did was complain about them!
[/QUOTE]
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thank you for all of the responses! I will be scrubbing the foundation down and coating it with wax in time for the bees to start their spring!
 

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A pressure washer is easier.
 
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