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7 Hives of Apis mellifera with some Africanization
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What? I beg to differ, where do you see a black thorax? The foundation she's standing on is "black", but her thorax certainly isn't. It looks darker than it actually is, only due to the lighting of the photo and the photo is not displayed in beesource at full size/resolution.

Perhaps the original poster could take another pic or two, from different angles and lighting, to confirm. Perhaps I am mistaken - I'd like to be certain.

Here's a pic of one of mine:
 

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Thank you JackChing, for the update and additional photos.
She certainly looks to have Cordovan coloration. I'm wondering why she's marked in red? It looks like a very good marking, but the international color for 2014 is green.
 

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Now we're in this debating circle again. Funny that this happens every year.
Beekeeping is so much fun. Don't you agree?

I'd say this one is an Italian queen. Though not sure what mutt she is.
She got the black dot at the end that a typical Corvodan does not.
Any queen with a black/darker spot at the end is label Italian.
If a Corvodan with a black dot at the end then she is a mutt to me. But to be label as
a Cordovan her body has to bee all uniform in yellowish/reddish bronze or such. Zbe got
the reddish color and Joseph got the yellow color Cordovan. And I don't know what is skc
mean? We'll see what Cordovan queen color I will get. Hopefully they will not have the darker
spot at the end.
 

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What is humorous :D to me now, is that I realize that few if any of you have kept any of your Cordovan Italian queens more than one season. I have several that are in their third year. But, even by their second year, they darken up considerably. I will try to get my camera out there, today and take a pic of a two year old Cordovan Italian and a three year old Cordovan Italian queen.

Believe it or not, the OP has indicated that this queen is at least going on her second season (it is why he marked her in red) - which explains why she is much darker than a Cordovan Italian queen who is only one year old, or less. Of course, if you've never kept a Cordovan Italian queen into her second or later years, you likely wouldn't be aware of how much they darken as they age. I've kept Cordovan Italian queens, off and on, for almost fifty years, several have always hung in there, past their first season. Most recently I've not only kept several, but for the past ten years or so, I've been raising about a hundred per year, more or less, and sharing them with others.
 

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What? I beg to differ, where do you see a black thorax?
The abdomen is orange, the thorax is black (actually a very dark brown). Color can not be used to identify honey bee types. All you can say about an orange queen is that she's orange. In the USA the bees are all mixed background (mutts if you want to call them that). Even in Europe, the bees are pretty well mixed up. You would have a hard time finding pure types now, except in isolated regions like parts of Turkey or the Caucasus Mountains
 
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