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It says the firefighters 'found the hive and took it down'. Sounds more like a paper wasp hive to me. How do we know these were not wasps?
 

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Omie,
Didn't you see the picture with the bees hanging from the eave, these were obviuosly bees. Wasps are not active this time of the year, here in Texas no wasp queens are flying yet. In the fall a wasp nest dies and it only the queens which survive. It is in early spring that these queens start to forage and gradually create a colony. In general a wasp nest has at most 400 inhabitants.
Janvanhamont
 

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How do we know these were not wasps?
The video. That's a bee.
My guess is AHB. The FD foamed them.

It is too bad they did not differentiate between AHB and European bees. They missed a chance to educate people about an invasive species vs a helpful insect.

RKR
 

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"If you find yourself being attacked, you should cover your eyes, nose and mouth and run away as fast as you can.":Dclose your eyes and run
 

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The video. That's a bee.
My guess is AHB. The FD foamed them.

It is too bad they did not differentiate between AHB and European bees. They missed a chance to educate people about an invasive species vs a helpful insect.

RKR
Oh, sorry, it thought it was just a newspaper article with no pictures or videos.
Pretty scary.
AHB sure are not helping the reputation of honeybees in the public eye! :(
 

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AHB and European honey bees are all the same species, Apis mellifera.

Of course, all honey bees could be considered "invasive species" here in North America, but that doesn't help the cause of beekeepers very much.
 

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AHB and European honey bees are all the same species, Apis mellifera.
Africanized honey bees (AHB), known colloquially as "killer bees", are hybrids of the African honey bee(Apis mellifera scutellata), (not A. m. adansonii see Collet et al., 2006), with various European honey bees such as the Italian bee A. m. ligustica and A. m. iberiensis. link

OK, so they are a hybrid of two different subspecies of Apis mellifera; it is neither one nor the other. It is also important to differentiate between pure races and these bastardized (in the truest definition of the word) hybrids that give all Honeybees a bad name.

So I think we can all agree that the AHB hybrid is not the same as a European honey bee (common in North America and elsewhere); similarly a mule is not the same as a horse nor the same as a donkey.

RKR
 

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Here is another article about the same incident and another:
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/35948593/ns/us_news-life

This second article is more informative. A swarm of bees is a very gentle thing. They have no instinct to sting. When they swarm, they're full to the gills with honey and have no nest or brood to protect. These attacks must have been provoked by someone or something. Bees don't just go after people for the fun of it. Too bad the reporters don't properly investigate these stories. Someone was probably messing with them or the nest and they responded, as well they should, like any other living creature would.

A bee's nest in the telephone pole? It would need a big enough cavity to hold a colony of bees. Don't think I would want that kind of hollow in telephone pole.
 

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im willing to bet that they absconded from their original hive probably due to human tampering. Were very much on the offensive when they came across these ladies who were probably wearing a certain perfume or something of the sort.
 

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So I think we can all agree that the AHB hybrid is not the same as a European honey bee (common in North America and elsewhere); similarly a mule is not the same as a horse nor the same as a donkey. -rkr
Quite a bit different, really. What would be more similar (and incorrect) would be saying that the offspring of a cross between a Clydesdale and a Morgan is not the same as a horse. See, a mule is a hybrid between two separate species. Hybrids between species often tend to be sterile, or at least have reduced fertility. Hybrids between races within species are usually fertile.

I agree that the bees in this story likely were AHB based on the general description.
 

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Quite a bit different, really.
Yup... that's my point.

In this hybrid they are not like the Apis mellifera ligustica which are manageable

Nor are they like Apis mellifera scutellata which are manageable

AHB are something different.... A "similar" result i.e. something very different and generally unmanageable using normal techniques, protocols, and tools used for either of the parents in the pure genetic form with in the sub-species they belong to. "stubborn as a Mule." "Kicks like a Mule." etc


The fact that the News folks did not differentiate between the AHB (hybrid, strain, species, sub-species, call it what you like) as being the likely culprit in this incident, could leave people with a fear of every bee/ hive they see. Any differentiation would have been better than none!!

Although calling it an "invasive species" was inaccurate, it would at least have gotten the message out "These are not your grandfather honeybees, and should not be treated as such! They are something different."

This would be in order, as a point of reference for the public. A point that we will have to work harder to make since first impressions stick so well.

I think that most would agree AHB are a "invasive pest", but no mention of that either in either story.

I am sure glad I do not have to deal with those things...... yet.

RKR
 

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AHB, thats BS. Get the media involved and it's AHB. Now you know how the fire dept reacted? Spray them. Then bill the federal gov. Get real America. Call a bee keeper. Never seeices to amaize me how un educated Americans are.
 

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From the article:
The incident is a reminder for people to be on high alert, say fire officials, because at this time of year bees are rapidly reproducing and easily provoked.
Hmm, not my girls, I got in to inspect today and could have worked them buck naked without being stung if I had wanted to. I think the Native Americans had it right, they aren't bees, they're white man's flies, although I would call them honey flies. If they went by that name I think public perception of them would be very different.
 

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Yup... that's my point. -rkr
That wasn't my point. My point was that the "hybridization" within Apis mellifera is far different than the type of hybridization that occurs between two species.

The interbreeding is occuring in a single species. Think of crossing two breeds of dogs. Or two breeds of horses. Here we're talking about crossing two breeds of bees.

Nor are they like Apis mellifera scutellata which are manageable. -rkr
I have no first-hand experience with A. m. scutellata. My understanding is that they are just as defensive as AHB. That's were AHB inherit their defensive traits.

I think that most would agree AHB are a "invasive pest", but no mention of that either in either story. -rkr
I know a number of people who refer to all honey bees that way.

Even if these bees were AHB, I'm surprised they would react the way this incident is described without some sort of provocation. I suspect we're not getting all the details leading up to this incident.

AHB, thats BS. -Beaver Dam
Why do you think these bees weren't AHB?
 
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