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Checked on my girls yesterday. Was a package installed on May 22nd. The queen is doing an amazing job!! I'm so impressed and happy with just how much this colony is exploding. I'm refilling the feeder every four days now. I'm going to feed for another two weeks. Wondering when it will be time to add another box. Or if I should add another brood box or add a super.
There are 5 frames(10 frame deep) that look like the one I posted so far. One other is solid full of eggs again. The population is going to really ramp up in a week or two.

Any tips for what to do about a second box in the North East TN region?
 

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Most folks say to wait until the bees have drawn 7 or 8 frames. I'd say to rotate in the outside not-drawn frames and once they are drawn and laid up add the second box. Otherwise the bees can move up into the new box and not touch the bottom outside frames. Just my 2 cents.
 

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Yes, you've got a heavy line of capped honey building up there-I start some frame manipulation to keep your productive queen laying and avoid any swarming instincts. After manipulation, check it again in a few days to see if they're filling in the blank foundation-then start thinking about a second box. Keep an eye out for swarm cells, e always found fast builder tend to be swarmy.
 

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Also in N.E. Tennessee here (Johnson city) and am working my first hive. A swarm that I caught about 3 weeks ago today in fact. They're going to town although not quite as far along as yours is. They've not touched the outermost frames on a 10 frame super but have started on the next 2 from the sides. So 6 frames filling quickly.

When they've started running out of space, should I use another deep super? I've seen hives with a deep box and then several shallow boxes on top of that. Still new at this.
 

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Also in N.E. Tennessee here (Johnson city) and am working my first hive. A swarm that I caught about 3 weeks ago today in fact. They're going to town although not quite as far along as yours is. They've not touched the outermost frames on a 10 frame super but have started on the next 2 from the sides. So 6 frames filling quickly.

When they've started running out of space, should I use another deep super? I've seen hives with a deep box and then several shallow boxes on top of that. Still new at this.
Are you talking about supers, or brood boxes?
 

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Well, I am new to beekeeping (less than 4 weeks) so the terminology isn't always correct.
I have one 10 frame hive box that is about 60% full. I call it a super but it is a brood box. I will be checking this week to see if they have reached 80% capacity. It has been 3 1/2 weeks since they adopted me, so I expect that brood will be hatching and the population of the colony will be on the increase.
We are in a more moderate climate so my question should have been is a deep hive frame most appropriate when I expand the brood boxes.
I did build some shallow boxes in case they the population takes off and they can produce some extra honey late in the year. If not, no biggie as I'm not in this for the honey, more so for the learning experience. Honey would be a plus but I am just fascinated by these little bugs.
 

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Well, I am new to beekeeping (less than 4 weeks) so the terminology isn't always correct.
I have one 10 frame hive box that is about 60% full. I call it a super but it is a brood box. I will be checking this week to see if they have reached 80% capacity. It has been 3 1/2 weeks since they adopted me, so I expect that brood will be hatching and the population of the colony will be on the increase.
We are in a more moderate climate so my question should have been is a deep hive frame most appropriate when I expand the brood boxes.
I did build some shallow boxes in case they the population takes off and they can produce some extra honey late in the year. If not, no biggie as I'm not in this for the honey, more so for the learning experience. Honey would be a plus but I am just fascinated by these little bugs.
OK, well, confusion arises when people use terms for something that have different meanings for others. We can't communicate effectively if we aren't all clear on the definitions.

A lot of people use deeps for brood boxes, and mediums or shallows for supers intended for harvest honey.

-Some- people use deeps for both brood and supers, but a deep full of honey has some weight to it, and those of us who are older tend to avoid it.

Some people use mediums for -everything-, and it helps to delineate between brood boxes and supers for harvest.

As for your particular area, I can't say specifically if you should run one deep or two for brood boxes. I generally run two or three deeps...but I am much further north and I have long, cold Winters so I need to make sure that they have enough stores to survive 6+ months of no forage available.

I don't think that running double deeps would hurt you, especially if you only have an ancillary interest in honey- if you end up with extra to harvest, it's a bonus for you.
 
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I did build some shallow boxes in case they do fill everything in the 2 deeps and I can get a little honey from them. It is my first hive and I want to do everything that I can to make them happy and safe bees.
When we moved here in 2006, there were old hives in the upstairs of the garage. I was cautioned about using old hive boxes, so I started with new. The smoker though belonged to my wife's great granddad and her mom remembers great granddad working the bees so the family is really keen on the idea. I even have his old smoker.
 

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I did build some shallow boxes in case they do fill everything in the 2 deeps and I can get a little honey from them. It is my first hive and I want to do everything that I can to make them happy and safe bees.
When we moved here in 2006, there were old hives in the upstairs of the garage. I was cautioned about using old hive boxes, so I started with new. The smoker though belonged to my wife's great granddad and her mom remembers great granddad working the bees so the family is really keen on the idea. I even have his old smoker.
Old boxes can be put back into use after torching/scorching them- using heat to kill any potential 'bad things' in them such as AFB spores (which otherwise could remain viable for 80+ years).

There are different methods of doing this- one is with a propane torch, but that can be somewhat time-consuming. Another is stacking the boxes and building a fire inside with newspaper...faster, but you have to get it right without catching the boxes themselves on fire. You need to scorch the insides enough to kill the spores but not completely burn up the boxes.
 
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