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Lost my nuc hive yesterday.

It was a gamble to see if the nuc could survive this brutal winter in New England.

From the pic you can see the dead girls. All their stores were empty and feeding them granulated sugar a few weeks back
did not help. This is the second hive out of 4 hives I have lost this winter. The two hives remaining appear to be fine, gave them comb with honey
from my first collapsed hive. The combs are disease free and they do not smell bad/ odorous.

I am not giving up and will get two packages this spring.

Dead Bees on frame . The whites specs are granulated cane sugar.

I hate witnessing dead especially when I could maybe have prevented it.

Nuc Hive Demise #2.jpg

These were a Russian Hybrid bees.
 

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man what a bummer :( were trying to hang in here too. we lost a few and only have a few left. we are in for a horrible few days coming up too. i think if they can make it through this next cold snap we'll be in the clear. lets pray for eachother for sure. this winter was a total downer for us through the midwest.
 

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Sorry to hear that man, hope your other two make it through okay.

We had temps in the mid 70's today. Went to install a fresh beetle trap and saw some bur comb making a bridge between frames that definitely wasn't there last week when I was moving frames around. Saw a solitary larva on the paving stone in front of the hive as well, so we're building comb and raising brood down here already.

Hopefully you won't be far behind us.
 

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It's bad here too. We went into winter with 9 hives, lost 2 early on, then another 4 by February. All had plenty of stores, but the first few deadouts seemed to be caught off guard by the cold and the clusters were a few frames away from the honey in the hive. I was really hoping the last 3 colonies would make it, but today was our first warm day in weeks and I'm down to 1 surviving hive. The last few winters I've had 100% of my hives make it thru winter. I treated all my hives last fall with Apiguard, which is what I've done the last few years. I know this was a rough winter, but I think I have to monitor more aggressively for mites throughout the year. Or maybe it wasn't mites that killed my hives, I don't know. Mite counts were pretty reasonable until end of summer.

I had ordered two bee packages for spring as insurance, just added another two packages to my order. When I install the new packages I'm going to put them in a new location. In their current location the hives have a good windbreak, and a good amount of sun in summer, but they go into shade by early afternoon in winter. I'm scouting out a new location where they'll get more sun next winter. I've never covered the hives with tar paper or anything like that, but I may look into that as well and hopefully I won't kill so many bees next winter. It's very disappointing, but live and learn I suppose.
 

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Why do you say you killed the bees? You have a system that has kept them well for years. This was an unusual winter and many have had heavy losses. I expect feral colonies have had heavy losses as well. Nature can be a &@$!
 

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Don't lose heart, the late January weather decimated my colonies. I had approximately 35 out of 40 alive start of January, yesterday when I checked I have nine colonies left. 9 out of 40. We had temperature swings that went from 30F during the day to -20F that night, the temperature swings were to rapid and to brutal for them IMO. Most have ample stores left (more for me to extract, ugh) and the winter clusters were spread out between top and bottom deeps as well as fragmented into 2 or even 3 different clusters. The bees just couldn't regroup in time to deal with the harsh weather changes. Couple that with the fact that there were at least 3 weeks here in Northern Wyoming where we had rapid temperature changes of 40 degrees or more and they were just set up for failure. Oh well, plenty of equipment to go around when I start rearing queens in a month or two.
 

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Why do you say you killed the bees? You have a system that has kept them well for years. This was an unusual winter and many have had heavy losses. I expect feral colonies have had heavy losses as well. Nature can be a &@$!
Which means any swarms you can catch should be extra good survival colonies.

Always look for that silver lining.
 
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