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Discussion Starter #1
I just checked my hive last week and everything was great, however i went in today and everything has gone to hell in a hand basket. first as you can see from the pictures they have made made 4 new bars but they all are curved, each more than the one before. i left 3 of the combs because they had capped cells in them and i didn't want to waste the honey. i added a spacer then i moved a good fully drawn comb from earlier in the hive and placed that at the end so they hopefully start making straight comb again. Was this the best way to handle this.

photo 1 (1).jpg photo 2 (1).jpg photo 3 (1).jpg photo 4 (1).jpg

the second issue is, when i moved this old comb i found that they had put two queen cells on it. what the heck is this about. the queen can't be dead because there is capped brood on comb that wasn't there last week. should i quickly make a new hive and split the new queens into it?

photo 5.jpg

Thanks for all your help, i wouldn't know what i would do without this forum
 

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That comb is still new and pliable. If it were mine, I'd try and straighten it out. If you crush a few cells in the process, they will fix it. As far as the queen cells, I can't see them very clearly in the picture; but all 3 of my TBH's have been through numerous queen cell builds this spring, even with a laying queen in the hive. I'd just let them be and allow them to sort it out. The bees might know that the existing queen isn't quite up to par, and they are replacing her while she is still laying eggs.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
sorry about the queen cell pics i didn't have a camera with me so i could only take a pic afterwards through the observation window and at that point they had bees on them and the window reflection makes it tough
 

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I agree with ruthie about manually straightening them out.

I would also probably rotate every other one (of the wavy ones) so that they have a harder time continuing what wave remains after your correction (assuming the other side is mostly straight).
 

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Discussion Starter #5
that is a great idea about roating it. i'll try that tonight just throw in a spacer to bridge the gap.

I tried straightening them out but they just bend back to their curved state.

As for the queen cells, i looked again this morning and found 2 more capped queen cells and 1 uncapped. i didn't do a full inspection just looking through the observation window. why the heck would they have 5 queen cells going?
 

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At the end of June, my nuc had 8 queen cells with a laying queen (good pattern too). I don't know why they did that many as there wasn't enough bees to be in swarm mode. I stole 6 of them (all on the same bar) for my other queenless hive, leaving them 2. I'm trying to stay out of both boxes while they sort it out. That nuc had raised their own queen back in May, so maybe they weren't happy with her for some reason. I'm just trying to watch and learn. And I've learned a whole bunch on queens this year. It has been a fascinating process.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
so all of the queen cells have hatched but i see no capped cells with anything other than honey in them. Most combs are filled with pollen with a 1inch strip of honey at the top. Did i lose my original queen and all of the queens that they were growing. I did see a few larva, but VERY few and only on one comb. is it time for an emergency queen?
 

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looking at the timeline, it could be that your new queen is just getting started. Did you locate her? I'd give her maybe 2 more weeks to kick it into high gear. If things still aren't up to snuff by then, I would get a new queen. You need to get a good population built up before winter and you probably only have a few more cycles of brood to do that.
 
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