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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here in Belize we are just starting a four month rainy season, our dearth.
Activity in the hive never stops but the resources nectar and pollen are reduced.
My first hive is a swarm captured late in the main nectar flow, about a month ago. Since then they have almost filled a 10 frame Lang with brood, pollen , and some capped honey. There is only two frames of foundation not drawn.

My thought was to add a second 10 frame deep brood to prevent swarming, But
being this close to a slow down would that be too much room for them?

I've tried talking to a local Belizean beekeeper and he tells me I should remove the honey, continue with one deep brood only, and feed them through the rainy season.
From what I've been reading it seems the brood box will overcrowd if I do that and initiate swarming.

My instinct is to add a second deep, let them have their honey, and feed them 2:1 till the main flow starts again.
Of course my bees have little to no consideration for my instincts.

Any of you Beeks in Florida or the deep south? Our climate is very similar to yours.
I would greatly appriciate any advise .:s
 

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Do not be greedy. Let them keep their honey. Do not add another super unless they crowd the upper super to 70 to 80 percent. If you give them too much to protect and climate control, it is a quicker death than possible swarming. They are less likely to swarm in rainy season because they know the chance of survival from the elements is worse. Even in the rainy season the bees go out between rains. They will gather a little. I have been to Belize a couple times. I frequent Honduras every year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks American,

It is only one single Lang 10 frame deep with a top cover and bottom board. I have not put on any honey supers yet . I wanted to build the colony strenth to two brood boxes first. Basically just an almost full deep of brood.
 

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Over here in Honduras I rarely see growth during the rainy season. Unless you are really feeding them hard, they probably won’t be building comb. Just about all my hives pretty much stay as they were from the beginning of the rains until the end. If anything, they go backwards.

It’s been raining here in my part of Honduras and I also have been seeing the bees coming and going. So there is a little something out there—to keep them alive at the most however. I never really see any growth this time of year, if any at all. Don’t worry too much about swarming.

Keep a close eye on their feed, however. They won’t hesitate to take off if they feel they are beginning to starve. Bees here don’t hang out until they are starved to death inside their hive. They’ll abscond, even if there are still rains.

Keep an eye on those last two frames that need to be drawn out. If that happens, then think about giving them more space. My initial reaction right now is to not worry until the flowers start up again and the rains begin to stop.

The earliest I begin to see a serious nectar flow in Honduras is in October. This is in the valley where I live (and also the southern part of the country)—classified as dry tropical. Up above the valley in the mountains (heading toward cloud forest) I don’t see any substantial nectar until in the last part of December. The dearth is a lot more serious up there since the rains are that much heavier. The rains come and go in the valley but it could drizzle all day up there for several days at a time.

Good luck. Don´t hesitate to ask my advice.

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Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Tom,
The main flow in Belize begins in January. Most local Beeks start to feed in September. I'll keep a close eye on their honey and feed accordingly.
 
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