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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Build-up is in high gear, so today I finally finished trimming the end bars on my PF120 stored combs (thanks to Sundance and Bt 'Aizawai' - virtually no comb damage to any). Using a 60 tooth, carbide cutoff blade, I set the high fence on the table saw, first at 1-5/16", then carefully ran the Top Bars on each frame, through on one side, then reset the fence to 1-1/4" and trimmed the opposite sides of the top bars, I only accidentally cut three wrong (both on the same side - oops).
 

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I think he is trying to reduce the size of the frames into more narrow frames. But how effective it is for beekeeping?
 

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I cut all my wooden frames down to 1.25 inches . I think it goes hand in hand with small cell comb . I tried cutting down some PF 120's once but did not have the same good outcome as Joseph did , I think my blade was not fine enough . It chipped and cracked the frames badly .
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Joseph, I'm not clear on what you were doing. What were you making them into?
Trimming the End Bars, from 1-3/8" wide to 1-1/4" width, removing 1/16" from each side, so the combs are still in the center of the frames. As has been-mentioned, 11 narrower frames fit in 10-frame supers, and 9 narrow frames fit in 8-frame supers. More combs, for me, means more area for resources, especially more brood --> more bees.
 

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Trimming the End Bars, from 1-3/8" wide to 1-1/4" width, removing 1/8" from each side, so the combs are still in the center of the frames. As has been-mentioned, 11 narrower frames fit in 10-frame supers, and 9 narrow frames fit in 8-frame supers. More combs, for me, means more area for resources, especially more brood --> more bees.
check your math.. you only want 1/16th off each side. 1/8th total. 2/8 = 1/4 woo fractions ;)
 

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I just set the fence to 1 1/4" and make a vee toward the cut side so I can keep them indexed in use. The 11 frames in a box results in much better comb being drawn. Makes the bees think small or something. the 11 frames after they are drawn are indeed a tight fit, but so are ten! I keep thinking I should try a thin follower board that can be pulled first. That would provide all the room you needed really.
 

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Thanks for the tips. I have never try the 1 1/4" end bar before. I cut out 22 frames of the 1 3/8" and set aside
a pile of the 1 1/4" end bars from my last built. I was thinking I cut the wrong size for the bee space.
Today I went thru the pile and found another 20 pieces of the 1 1/4" end bars. This will be my next project to
build some narrow frames just in time for the main Spring flow. I tested some wax strip yesterday on the 1 3/8" frames
and they are drawing out the nice little white wax cells today. Going for all small cells on narrow natural frames this year.
Good thing I did not throw away the 1 1/4" awhile back. What an inspiration. Learn something here everyday.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Okay, I continued to round up my many other PF-120 and PF-125 frames, and trim their End Bars, too.

Most of them trimmed down easily, leaving a new edge that was slightly rough, feeling like sand paper. But, a few of the older frames, or some that were more exposed to the weather (especially exposure to sunlight), would chip quite a bit, and though the final edge was primarily the correct dimension, and usable, they were certainly a great deal more damaged looking than most of the other (100+ frames), but they should do, fine.
 
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