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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking to plant some trees that would serve as pollen or nectar sources for my bees. I'm in zone 5 and I have about 7 acres to plant on.
I'm looking at Catalpa, Red Maple, Tulip Poplar, and maybe serviceberry, sourwood, sumac or a type of willow.
Some of the land sits under water when we get heavy rains. I was thinking that the Red Maple would be good there. I also have someone sending me Swamp Tupelo seeds.
Any other suggestions are welcome.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm trying to stay away from trees with thorns. These will be in my horse pasture. Redbuds grow well around here. We have one in our backyard and my brother has tons of them in his woods. I love them in the spring, so I'll look at getting some seedlings dug up and transplanted.
I have some apple trees and pear trees planted and have 2 more Asian pears on the way for spring.
The fruit trees are and will be planted outside the pasture area.

Thanks, and any more suggestions?
 

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Brenda,
I just got a catalogue from someplace called Burgess Plants & Seed. They are located in Illinois somewhere as I recall. It looked like they had very good prices on plants, but I've never ordered from them and know nothing about them. I have recently planted 25 Rose of Sharon that I bought off the web for about $40 (including freight), and I think Burgess had a better price. I really don't know how much the bees use Rose of Sharon, seems like the bumbles like it best, but I like it's blooming period of Summer to Fall. Burgess also had some type of hedge willow and pretty good prices on Sand Cherries. You might check them out. As for the bees, I have two giant Tulip trees that bloomed beautifully last year. As far as I know, my bees never touched them, but loved the white clover in my neighbors field.
 

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The tulip poplar is a very popular one here. Persimmon trees are good for a late blooming tree, and the bees seem to love it. (and they aren't an issue with horses, I have 5 in my pasture) Ty Ty Nurs. in GA is a very reasonable priced place to order from also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I got a Burgess catalog today too. It doesn't have very good reputation (per Dave's GardenWatchdog), but probably wouldn't hurt to buy a few cheap and hardy trees from. I wouldn't spend anything I wasn't ready to lose there though.


I used to have a persimmon tree in my back yard, and cut it down long ago because of the mess the fallen fruit made. I could possibly put a few out in the back pasture where I don't have to mow.
 

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Hazel is a very early pollen source in my area and the bees work it heavily. I don't know about your location but here it can start to bloom mid Feb. or into Mar. depending on the type of winter we're having. If it's fairly close to the hives they don't have to go to far to collect it when the temps are hovering around the flying point.
 

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They work hazalnut, don't know what they get from it. I didn't know that you had horeses, i've heard that the leaves of the black locust tree are poison to livestock and so are the blackcherry tree. Jack
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yeah, I went through and cut down any wild cherry trees, and just this last summer I had to cut down a few sapling thorn trees that are from my neighbors tree. I'm thinking of fencing off the area near his thorn tree (it's right on the other side of the fence line) and using that area for fruit trees.
When I bought it had that area fenced off and like a dummy, I took it down.:eek:
 

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Our bees made 2 suppers of honey on new plastic frames when the privets bloomed at the end of summer last year.

Privet is a large bush too small tree.
 

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Hazel nut, they work it for the pollen.

Our bees made 2 suppers of honey on new plastic frames when the privets bloomed at the end of summer last year.

Privet is a large bush too small tree.
Do you have any views on the quality of the privet honey?
Any privet bush that I've seen in bloom really attracts the bees.
 

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I am fairly certain the privet in California is different from the privet we have in the South. The Southern privet has a reputation of making foul tasting honey even though the bees love it. I try to kill it. I was imported from Japan a century ago or more and spread everywhere. Many people around here hate it. My neighbors probably still curse my grandparents who were the first to plant it in this area back in the 1920's. So, check more thoroughly before you plant it.
 

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Basswood/linden makes good honey. You could also consider the Bee Bee tree (Korean Evodea) which blooms in late summer when nothing else is blooming.
 

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The Hoptree (Ptelea trifoliata) can be very good:

The hop-tree occurs from New England and Ontario south to Florida
and westward to Michigan, Illinois and Missouri to central Texas. It is
a shrub or small tree known also as wahoo and quinine tree. The bitter
fruit is sometimes used as a substitute for hops. The flowers have a dis-
agreeable odor. Scholl lists the honey yield as good, and very good, in favorable seasons, where the shrub is abundant.
 

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The privet we grow here makes good honey.
People here also grow texas privet as a shrub, but the leaves are different. The Texas has a wrinkled shiny leaf,

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/1725/

This website says it can grow in zones 8-10
another website showed it down to zone 4

My plant is covered with ripe seeds right now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I looked up a list of trees toxic to animals-

Trees

Black walnut
Red Maple and its hybrids
Oak
Black locust
Golden chain tree
Horse chestnut, buckeye
Chokecherry
Kentucky coffee tree
Russian Olive
Persimmon
Chinese tallow tree

It looks like I won't be planting Red Maples, or persimmons in the pasture, but there have been oak trees in there all along and I've had no problem with them.
 

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Brenda, i live on a century farm and the black walnut, persimmon, and oak trees grow wild here and have never caused any livestock(cattle and horses) deaths that i'm aware of. A neighbor lost some cows from eating acorns from the oak trees, the vet said they ate to many and got compacted, called it acorn poisoning.:scratch: He also has wild buckeye growing along his branch and has never had any problems from them, my dad used to say buckeyes would kill hogs. Just some useless information from an old sprout cutter.:D Jack
 
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