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I was wondering (and I know alot of factors contribute) how significant different honey trees are singularly? I know the weather has alot to do with it and how many hives are competing...

The reason I ask is because I have a 60' Tulip tree about 30' from my new hives providing them some afternoon shade. I just wondered if this one tree alone would have alot of effect on their production. And not just THIS one tree but other one trees... I am constantly changing my lanscaping and trying to figure out how to shove more bee plants in the yard. I think I am going to put in a couple of pussy willows because I know they are good build up plants in the early spring. I also have a spot where I may put in no more than 2, if that, sourwoods.

I live in the suburbs and have a half acre lot. How much can I actually boost production. Will these few trees really make a noticable difference at maturity?

Thanks, John
 

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It mainly depends on what they are finding, if they are on say a good sweet clover flow, they can and will ignore a blooming tree five feet from the hive. Let me put it another way, last year I wanted to get the frames from a purchased nuc out of my hive because I knew the seller used hard treatments so I stuck them out on my back fence...these where full of capped and uncapped honey. Not a single bee was seen on them for weeks, then whatever they where on waned and they tore the frames up!!

 

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If you're asking if 1/2 acre will make a difference, the answer is probably not much.

But don't let that stop you from planting bee friendly plants.

And then convince everyone else in town to do the same thing.

Trees can be part of a season long assortment of pollen and nectar producing plants.
 

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Your best bet on improving honey production on a half acre lot would be to find the first pollen in your area and plant the whole thing to that so that they can build up faster to make a stronger hive during your areas main flow. Willows are probably a safe bet.:)
 

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You may want to consider planting trees that flower in late summer. This way the tree bloom provides a nice nectar source during what is normally a dearth.

The Korean Evodea (BeeBee tree) is supposed to be a good honey producing tree that flowers in late summer.
 
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