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So I wanted to ask this, and I didn't see a thread for it, so I hope its OK.

I wondered if there's some studies about the success of hives, their honey production, and the # of hives supportable in an area based on numbers of trees on acreage?

I don't see anything talking about it and wondered about it. Maybe its a noob question, but when you look at the forum, there doesn't really seem to be anyone talking about trees related to hives.

I mean when you see all those people in the South with their beautiful apiaries chock full of dozens of hives in their videos it looks like there's a ton of trees in their areas and towns. And maybe this is creating a certain environment.

(I'm sure others know more about it than me.)

And I wonder also if bees can make honey from coniferous trees (pine tree types), etc?

If I were to put 100 hives in an area full of trees, and 100 in similar terrain but very few trees I wonder how they would compare.

Well I'm kind of chatty, so please don't hold it against me. XD

And thanks also in the past so many wonderful people already sharing their knowledge on other things I've asked about.
 

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Im.thinking deciduous trees would be best. As bees dont.normally use pine for much. Pines do create lots of pollen, but I don't think they use it much at all. Hardwoods make lots of useable pollen, and nectar.
As.far as studies, I'm not sure of them. I do know that trees are very important to bees, just as much as flowers ect. If ya find any studies, pass em along, as I would be interested, as well as many others out here.
Rich
 

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I am pretty sure it would depend on what trees you are talking about. I am in a residential area and it is not uncommon the last 7 years to get 50 - 75 pounds of maple honey per hive in the spring. After that, there are fairly few summer producing trees in the area. Areas with basswood / lindens could get a pretty good early summer harvest. Bees in this area don't bother with any of the conifers. In early summer blackberrys come on then fire weed and then knotweed but there are no significant sources of summer tree flowers in the area.
 

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This is my first post, and I'm very much a beginner, however I will say that on some days my spruce trees are humming with honey bees collecting something, sap for propolis, I assume.
 

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So I wanted to ask this, and I didn't see a thread for it, so I hope its OK.

I wondered if there's some studies about the success of hives, their honey production, and the # of hives supportable in an area based on numbers of trees on acreage?
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Somehow I suspect you equate the trees to forage.

The trees are only a varying part of the bee forage (by this I mean the blooming trees that bees have significant degree of interest in).

Often and in some places, the tree-part is approaching zero percent of the overall bee forage.
Other times and in other places, the tree-part is approaching the hundred percent.

So then such question is pretty much meaningless, until you specify exact location you are asking about.

So, what is your question again?
 

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Like others said, it depends on trees, your climate, and what else (flowering shrubs, wild flowers, crops and etc) is available in your neighborhood.

I’m in Zone 8, and I would love to have winter blooming trees in my property, so that my bees can bring in fresh pollen right after the winter brood break, without flying far. I have an European hazelnut tree and a winter cherry tree, both of which are very popular. I wish I had a silver maple.

In mid-late summer, after roadside weeds wilted (our summer is pretty dry), honey bees are often seen on late-bloomers, such as evergreen magnolia and crape myrtle. I believe Chinese elm is also honey bee-friendly.

If I had a large property and budget, I would plant serious nectar producers that bloom in early spring - early summer, such as several different species of maples and hawthorns, black locust, tulip poplar, and linden. For now, I get honey from somebody else’s trees plus several invasive plants.

In some areas, honey bees may collect honeydew from confer trees, but probably not much in my neighborhood; in the past 4 years, I have seen bees collecting honey dew only once, and that was from a beech tree.
 

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Would you want to eat a daily diet of bread and water? That is what happens to bees in a monofloral environment. With only one or just a few species to forage on, the bees are unlikely to meet their daily nutritional needs, particularly for protein.

In a mixed stand of hardwoods with other flowering plants, bees may forage on several hundred different species over the course of a year. Willow is an early pollen source, maple provides both pollen and nectar, fruit trees vary but generally provide both pollen and nectar, Yellow Poplar provides an abundance of nectar, linden and sourwood provide honey with some pollen, and the list goes on. Modifying your question a tad, if an area has a wide diversity of nectar and pollen producing plants including large numbers of trees, it should support bees over a long season. The rule of thumb I use is that this region (Northwest Alabama) can support about a dozen colonies at a single location.

Some areas can support an apiary of 40 colonies with apiaries spaced about 1 per square mile. Highly productive areas might support 60 colonies in an apiary but this will generally be locations with low growing plants like clovers, etc. Keeping more than 60 colonies in an apiary usually requires a larger unconflicted forage region, meaning no other apiaries nearby.
 
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