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Some closer-up pictures might help with confirmation of what it may be.

I am going to guess horse chestnut based on the shape and size and the white blossom clusters I think I see.
 

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Agree with Knisely. Better pic would help, but looks like a horse chestnut. There are several apps that will allow you to take a pic and it will tell you what tree,bush,flower it is. For trees, I have a small reference book that is handy. I like the apps for flowering bushes and flowers. J
 

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It may be a Linden tree commonly called a Basswood tree.

but again the pictures are a ways off and hard to tell.

Happy Home
 

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Of course this is not a Linden (Basswood) tree.
:)

Indeed, this is some kind of a nut-bearing tree (Horse Chestnut very much likely).
 

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Ditto, Linden blossoms although similar tend to lean to the sides, not like the tree pictured where the blossoms are more upright. Horse chestnut usually have a pink center to each flower when white.

Basswood /Linden trees are heavily favored by bees and produce a lot of nectar.

In Michigan where I live there are a lot of them in area woods. It is a prime consideration for when I start placing hives. I am already getting permissions. They blossom over a longer period of time as individual trees in the same woods will blossom at different times.

With the proliferation of Russian olive trees blossoming now along with honey suckle bushes, a walk in the woods is like a walk in a perfume factory. It is interesting that while the scent is strong it doesn't seem overpowering, unlike getting downwind of some perfumes worn by people, this causes me to run for a door wanting to hold my nose.:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
not a basswodd they haven't bloomed yet. If it is a some sort of chestnut tree do the bee's work them?
 

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I can't remember the name of the tree, but they look like the ones that make a mess, and have long thin things that hang down after blooming, I don't think bees touch them
 

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I can't remember the name of the tree, but they look like the ones that make a mess, and have long thin things that hang down after blooming, I don't think bees touch them
You're thinking of a catalpa which I don't think his picture is of. It looks more like a horse chestnut or buckeye.
 

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Can someone IS this tree? Is it a good nectar/pollen producer. It’s like 400 Ft. from my hives
I'm a horticulturist; It is Aesculus, family of the Horse Chestnut and Buckeye. The family is toxic and there have been debates forever about whether it is toxic to Bees.
It is absolutely not Tilia, family of the Linden tree. the flowers of the Lindens hang down. I have planted several Tilia Cordata, Little Leaf Lindens as food for my bees.
 
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