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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
As I've been reading the various controversies about "Trap Outs," I've been wondering if it is possible to build a tunnel between the colony and hive with the funnel in the tunnel.

My reasoning is if the queen leaves the old nest in the end, wouldn't she then join the family in the new body? In the conventional method, the hive is placed with the entrance perpendicular to the normal egress (Yuh I are a frustrated righter...), and close to the base of the funnel. Several frames of brood are placed in the new body to entice the frustrated bees in.

My guess is the funnel would have to be placed after the bees had time to get used to using the new hive body as an entrance/exit, and possibly pull some comb in it.

Edit: I thought I was clear enough, but after years of explaining the computer to people, I discover there will always be someone who doesn't get it. So here is an illustration of what I'm talking about.



There would be no brood or eggs in the hive, just a tunnel from the old colony to channel the smell of the old hive and keep the bees there, no eggs to transform into queens, but no way back into the old hive. I know it isn't done that way in a conventional trap out, this isn't conventional
 

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problem 1) The bees trapped out will have been making a queen while trapped out of their hive. This they will do from the eggs that will cause them to stay in the new hive rather than struggle to find a new way into their old home.

problem 2) It will take several weeks if not a couple months to trap out the colony. By the time the queen leaves the old colony the bees that have been trapped out will mostly be gone. minimal direct family left.

problem 3) There will be a queen in the new hive when the old queen comes out of the old colony. If she tries to enter the new hive she will be an intruder. Queen phermones only last for 12 to 24 hours, and then they don't know who the queen is anymore.
(that is why you wait a day queenless before you try to requeen a hive)

It may be possible, but You have a massive obsticle to overcome with the time it takes to colapse the existimg hive to the point of her leaving.

If she has genetics you want to keep, a cut-out is about the only way to get her.
 

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I did something similar. We had a cone on the tree and then attached a tube to the funnel and stuck it into the entrance of the new hive. We did not place eggs in the new hive just brood. We captured the queen in about 3 weeks to a month.
Now the tree has another hive in it. Do not know if it is from the eggs of the original queen or a swarm that moved in.
I would not do a trap out in this heat now because as soon as you weaken the hive by taking the foragers the hive beetles will overrun it.

We did a second one and did not capture the queen. The tree had a large opening and the cone we used should have been much bigger at the base. Many of the bees could not find there way out.

Use a large base cone and they will follow the funnel to the end - then attach a tube to that. connect the tube to a hole in the back of the new hive.
 

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check out CLEO HOGAN's swarm harvester as sold by WALTER KELLEY's. the exact idea, but with the more common lang hive. a frame of brood gets the queen right in the trap.
good luck,mike
 
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