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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Homeowner where I collected my last swarm wants the bees gone from the tree they are living in. They've been in there for a few years.

It's about 45 minutes from home, I want to help the guy... but I don't want to be driving out there every day for weeks on end. He and his wife have a new kid that's just getting old enough to start running around the yard and he's worried it may end up being a problem. I get that standpoint and would rather 1) keep the bees from being needlessly killed while maybe getting the genetics of the hive and 2) come to a satisfying conclusion for the home owner that doesn't result in someone ending up stung 50 times trying to dish soap or hose the hive to death.

What are my options. The hole in the tree is eye level and easy access all the way around. I do not know how big the cavity in the tree is, but with the way this hive has thrown swarms in the past my guess is that it is pretty big. He says some days there are so many bees that he and his wife have to walk the other way around the house to avoid them.

IMG_20140610_130804_200.jpg

The other problem will be trying to seal up the tree if I can get them trapped out (and there will still be comb/honey/brood). As you can see, the branch that died there left a big opening. There are at least two small holes they are using, one being up at the top of that section, the other the obvious hole near the bottom. I don't know how you could reliably seal that big of an area? At that point I wonder if I should try to remove that entire dead chunk and see if the colony is accessible for cutting out once it's gone?

Just looking for ideas/opinions.

Thanks!
 

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Just my $.02 worth, I've never did a cutout or trap out from a tree. If they don't mind you driving a few nails into the tree I'd use a light piece of luan plywood cut to fit the opening, tack it into place and caulk any gaps. Of course any trap out modifications to the plywood should be made before installation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'd like to eliminate the need to travel a whole bunch, but I'd like the genetics. What about installing a deep box, setting up as normal for a trap out w/ cone and then drilling a hole towards he bottom of the brood nest and trying to drive them out that way? Additionally. Would something like Bee Quick cause the bees to abandon their brood in the tree or would I mainly drive out the foragers?
 

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Hogan trapout will be the only way to really get the queen without cutting out once you get them coming and going install a frame of open brood and a junk queen in a cage if you can and install your cone as I have read of better success of the queen coming out that way. Once you get her out you could pull the box and put up another one when the new queens hatch in the hive you might get a second batch once she returns from her mating flight after they are all out seal the tree with foam and then finish it off with concrete mortar
 

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If the home owner wants them gone ask if you can cut into the trunk around the entrance. If they agree you the could do a typical cut out.
 

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You know, when the right strong wind comes through that tree will probably snap. Where it will land...who knows. Looks like a nice house behind it. The owners will say "act of God", "mother nature", "one of those things", etc.,. If you cut into that tree and a strong wind comes along and blows it down, then guess who's fault it will be...

Ed
 

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I agree, cutting will weaken it, but suggesting to the owner to cut it down is an opinion to consider. But try to get the Professional to cut above the hive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The house isn't terribly nice, and I agree, the tree looks fit to tumble.

Time isn't a very big deal in the sense that I could install the box and funnel and wait out the queen. Would she eventually come up?
 

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Well, the nice is *very* nice if it belongs to you and somebody causes a big tree to fall on it.:rolleyes:

The queen will eventually come out but it depends on which type of trapout you are doing whether you will get her or not. Study up on the Hogan trap.

tomkat, I agree, that tree needs to be coming down in a controlled kind of way...of course, saying that, it'll probably stand another 50 years. ;)

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well, the nice is *very* nice if it belongs to you and somebody causes a big tree to fall on it.:rolleyes:

The queen will eventually come out but it depends on which type of trapout you are doing whether you will get her or not. Study up on the Hogan trap.

tomkat, I agree, that tree needs to be coming down in a controlled kind of way...of course, saying that, it'll probably stand another 50 years. ;)

Ed
Don't get me wrong, I wouldn't want a tree to fall over on my tent if that's what I had. How the nice the house is or isn't is immaterial to the situation.
I'll mention that the tree looks like it needs to come down and see what he says. I think it's pretty obvious where the "cavity" looks to be, which means it has to be pretty weak right there.
 

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That tree is like one in the way of my pond being finished. It looks like a fart would blow it over, but no. It still stands.
 
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