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Picking up my packages this week and I am unsure how I should transport them. I will only be picking up 6 at this time. Will I be ok putting them in the back of my car? It has a large trunk 2012 camaro and the trip will only be 2.5 hours to return with them.

I have a truck but it is a 2500 and it thirsty for fuel.

Will I be ok putting them in my car?

I will place some moving blankets to prevent the sugar syrup and other stuff from getting on the carpet. Just worried about heat and ventilation. Temp is supposed to be in the high 60's to low 70's.
 

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Put the bees in the passenger compartment of the car, not the trunk. If the temperature is good for you, they will be OK too. If you need to, run the air conditioner.
 

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I may put them in the trunk and put the seat down. I would have one mad wife if I came home and there was a scratch in the seat.
 

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Most modern cars have some sort of "pass through" that opens to the backseat or can fold a seat down so some climate control of the trunk area occurs. I would not worry about them in the trunk on a mild day. Most (if not all) packages pick up hitchhikers. Those hitchhiking bees will leak into the passenger compartment - even with the pass thru closed and back seat up.... Be prepared to have loose bees in the passenger compartment. I haven't found them to be aggressive but, if that would be a concern to you, you might consider the truck.
 

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I have had a hundred packages in the back of my minivan... If you are afraid of bees this could be a problem as there are always some loose bees on the outside of the packages. They have no interest in you, but they may be buzzing around the car... The good think about having them in the car with you is you can maintain a good temperature as you will be aware of the temperature...
 

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Haul them inside the vehicle with you. Truck or car, makes no difference since you should be hauling them in the passenger compartment. Don't worry about the few bees flying around outside the packages. It's a good way to get acquainted with your bees.
 

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>It's a good way to get acquainted with your bees.

Just as long as you don't panic and have a wreck...
Good time to get acquainted with a lot of your bees! Just don't expect the emergency personnel to be happy about it.

We hauled our first two hives home in the back of a hatchback. We kept it cooler than normal in the car, and it kept any ones that wanted to explore kind of calm and in the back. I really wasn't comfortable with one buzzing my ear while flying, but now I've had them crawling around several times while I'm driving and it doesn't bother me much. Not sure why all the non bee people think I'm crazy?
 

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I think I am gonna end up with 3 packages in the back of my Durango. But it's still cold up here (30 degrees) today, so unless we hit a warm spell its only likely to be 40 when we get our bees.

My first packages last year were in a CR-v with me...once we closed the doors you heard just the buzz of 18,000 bees....my buddy put his hood up and cinched down while imploring me "to not crash the car" fearing of a spontaneous release of bees! It was definitely a "baptism into beekeeping" memory!
 

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Last year I had a couple of nucs sitting in the back of my Jeep on my way home from picking them up. A sherrif's deputy pulled me over as I went through a sleepy little town because i "didn't have running lights" on my trailer. He asked, "you have anything in here I need to know about? What's in those boxes?" I told him, "they're just bees, maybe 20,000 give or take a few thousand." and it was amazing how disinterested he was in anything i had going on. He just said to get the lights fixed and havea nice night. He didn't even bother to check for wants/warrants. There is just something about stinging insects that "normal" folks don't want to be around.
 

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I transported 27 packages from Utah to Montana last year. Had originally planned on using a pick up but a snow storm blew in so we took a Suburban. Several free flying bees in the car but, no problem except my wife was tired of huddling under a blanket for 6 hours. Toward the end it did stink a little. Picking up 40 packages this year. Hope to use the pickup this year.
 

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I was hauling bees on a trailer once and I thought I was going to get pulled over because this cop got right on my tail. Like 6 feet from the backend of my trailer. Then he backed off and turned around. I think he figured out what it was and didn't want to mess with it. I don't think my trailer lights were working at the time, so I was worried... once they realize they are bees they do tend to lose interest...
 

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Haul them inside the vehicle with you. Truck or car, makes no difference since you should be hauling them in the passenger compartment. Don't worry about the few bees flying around outside the packages. It's a good way to get acquainted with your bees.
I know a guy who did this and cooked his bees. Maybe air conditioning is better now a days.
 

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Getting extra bees on the outside may or may not be an issue. Last package I got was being kept inside in the AC to start with and had no hitchhikers at all. I put it in the floorboard of the passenger side and drove home with no issues at all.
 
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