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Discussion Starter #1
Last year was my first year with bees. I lost my hive. When I returned from a three week trip I found that what was left was decimated.... wing mutation etc. I am assuming mites. I have learned much since; continued to take advantage of bee classes/education, books and YouTube. I have a new hive (from Bee Thinking) and adjusted my old one to make the bars/sizes standard between them. I was wondering how much of the comb I should save and how do you cut and save them? I have seen the hair clamps and tie method for attaching.

Here is a shot of my girls a mere six weeks before their loss.

Bee Maintainance-4.jpg

Bill
 

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It looks as though the comb from your old hive is nicely centered on the bars. Is there an issue with just trimming the comb to fit the new hive? I would use all the comb that is useable.
 

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Yes, I would need to cut it off that old bars and add it to the new ones. So my questions are: 1. should I use all or just one or two combs per hive? and 2. how do you recommend cutting then reattaching?

Thanks,

Bill
 

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Yes, I would need to cut it off that old bars and add it to the new ones. So my questions are: 1. should I use all or just one or two combs per hive? and 2. how do you recommend cutting then reattaching?

Thanks,

Bill
Not understanding why you want to cut and reattach your comb, but I don't need to. I would only redo a couple to make sure they start building the comb right.
 

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Are the bars shorter than the new hives bars? If not you can rework the bars with a hand saw and chisel. Then there is no need to detach the combs. If there is anyway to reuse the combs without detaching them that would be my first choice. If detaching I would build frames to fit the TBH and rubber band all the combs in the frames.

Use as much of the comb as you have divided between the hives.

Frames like this.
PICT0005.jpg
 

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Place the bars in a vice so that the comb is point up rather than down. Saw the excess wedge down to the flat and chisel it out horizontally so that you have a flat surface to rest on the side walls. Then cut the excess wood that over hangs the side walls.

If this seems too difficult then do what you feel will work I'm sure everything will work out in the end.
 

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Deformed wing virus is primarily caused by varroa. Some people believe the virus can remain in the comb even after the varroa problem has been addressed, and they don't reuse the comb. I don't know if there is any research verifying that, though. You might want to look into it.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks Delta Bay, however, I don't like how the old bars were constructed-they warped, the pointed guides were separate and were splitting from the bars etc. The new ones are all one piece and made of cedar.
 

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I just got a Bee Thinking tbh this week. I think it will be a great hive:)
 
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