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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I posted here that I had some issues with a hive being queenless. Well I pulled a frame from a nearby hive to give to them. When I popped the lid today I noticed it wasn't so hot and the second frame in I found eggs, I thought it was a laying worker issue but when I pulled the next frame, I found the queen walking on the next frame over. The hive was queenright. I thought it was strange that there was a queen so fast; that maybe there was a virgin queen in there a few weeks back and that she was not laying. Well, when I inspected the hive I took the frame from it was queenless. No eggs or larva to be found, some capped brood and some mean bees.

I guess the other hive accepted the queen without issue. :p But I now created a queenless hive. :(
so
One of the swarms that I caught has been growing like crazy. It's filled the second deep already and it's started building out some super comb but it's got a capped superceedure cell and some swarm cells as well. I'm guessing they are going to swarm soon. If I steal the superceedure cell frame and give it to the queenless hive would that be the right more? Or, should I pull the frame with the swarm cells and use that and let them superceed? I found the queen in the hive so I know she's still alive.

Thanks to all.
 

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Yes you can give the queen less hive a capped cell. Your hive that is in swarm prep is going to swarm.
The only way you can stop it is to pull the old queen and a few frames, three or four and put her in a nuc.
You then have to leave no cells in the hive that are not on the same frame. Preferably no more than two.

You can put the other cells in nucs with a couple or three frames of brood if their on different frames or if you can cut them out and transfer them to another frame.

Your window to do this is short and closing fast.
 

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Sometimes we have to ask the questions you have in order to figure things out right. When you say you have both supersedure cell and swarm cell, you i'm guessing are referring to it's location on the frames. Normally speaking they do one, or the other, but not both. If you found cells down on the bottom bar and they are a really beefy colony, it's most likely swarm cells, but they would be backfilling the nest right now with honey if it were. So with that said, you can sort out what they are really up to there.

Now with the actual problem you have. There's debates going constantly on which type of cell produces the best queen, emergency/supersedure, or Swarm. Emergency cells the girls will use up to a 3 day old larva (meaning 6 total days old), with supersedure they start with the egg, and swarm cells they start with the egg. Some say that the emergency don't produce as good of queens due to how they pick the larva.

So what I would say at this point honestly, you probably have a couple very good queens getting ready to come along. Take the one that looks the oldest and give to the queenless colony. That hive has a good queen, her genetics are solid and you should be fine. IMO
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Sometimes we have to ask the questions you have in order to figure things out right. When you say you have both supersedure cell and swarm cell, you i'm guessing are referring to it's location on the frames. Normally speaking they do one, or the other, but not both. If you found cells down on the bottom bar and they are a really beefy colony, it's most likely swarm cells, but they would be backfilling the nest right now with honey if it were.
Not back filling the brood nest, it's full of mostly capped bees right now.

So with that said, you can sort out what they are really up to there.

Now with the actual problem you have. There's debates going constantly on which type of cell produces the best queen, emergency/supersedure, or Swarm. Emergency cells the girls will use up to a 3 day old larva (meaning 6 total days old), with supersedure they start with the egg, and swarm cells they start with the egg. Some say that the emergency don't produce as good of queens due to how they pick the larva.

So what I would say at this point honestly, you probably have a couple very good queens getting ready to come along. Take the one that looks the oldest and give to the queenless colony. That hive has a good queen, her genetics are solid and you should be fine. IMO
One frame has what I'd call a superceedure cell on it, mid frame, about 1.5" long and running vertically on the frame. The other cells are just starting, one queen cup has a nice big larva in it but it's not capped. I was going to just divide the 2 deeps into 2 hives before I knew I had a queenless hive. I guess I'll try something tomorrow, right or wrong, LOL.
 
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