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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I took some advice to treat tracheal Mites in August with menthol. So I found a West Virginia University paper on Menthol-Canola oil mix soaked into paper towels for a treatment method. Sounded good so this morning I put these soaked paper towels in two of my five 2010 hives along with fresh sugar water in an upper feeder. A shower of rain stopped me. I went back a few minutes ago to complete the other three hives but found that my first two hives had a few thousand bees bearding all over the landing board and hive sides. Fifty times more bees than the three untreated hives. I'm afraid that the menthol fumes ran them out. What do you think? Could it trigger a swarm? Is this method o.k.? Does anyone treat tracheal mites with menthol?
I'm a little lost.
Thanks Benny
 

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I filled my inhive frame feeder and the bees came out,I think my sugar water was to hot they calmed back down.The uga web site on bees says treat tracs with veg oil and sugar I tried it last sunday.Type in uga beekeeping keith duplane has done alot of research good luck.
 

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When you treat with menthol in the hot summer time with the 50gram packet it says to put in under the frames and i figure if you were to put the paper towel in under the bottom it would not run them out as bad the fumes would not be as strong.

Apiguard will treat both T-V mites all in the same treatment it takes 2 treatments 2 weeks apart and if you use Apiguard in the hot summer use only about 1/2 dose even less if a single on a 5 frame nuc
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the help. I just went back out and the bees seem to be back in the hive and working away. Even overcast and 85 degrees here the fumes must have been pretty strong at first. As instructed I put the paper towels on top of the frames of both brood boxes. Under the botom may have been better. I have some Apistan for V mite treatment in a month or two. Taking care of both at once sounds better.
 

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Now varroa mites are easily seen by eye and thru sampling, but tracheal are pretty darn small. So, my question is, what lead you to believe that you had tracheal mites to begin with? And once you suspected that you did, did you get lab confirmation?

Unnecassary treatments are not beneficial and are a waste of money, time and resources. So be sure first. That is my advice.
 

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Are tracheal mites a problem there? Our state apiary inspector said Ohio has had a whole whopping 3 cases of tracheal mites this year out of 5900+ apiaries.
 

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Because they disappeared just like they appeared. Or are they still w/ us at really low levels? Where did they come from to begin with? I think it is interesting that tracheal showed up and then right on it's tail, actually they don't have tails being arachnidae, varroa shows up and no more tracheal mites.

What happened?
 

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What happened?
The susceptible strains died out. I saw it happen. Over several years, the "yellow" bees crashed and the dark bees thrived. There's still a level of TM out there, but it has become a minor pest...at least in bees that haven't been propped up with menthol/grease treatments. Of all our problems, TM resistance is the easiest to select for.
 

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>Because they disappeared just like they appeared. Or are they still w/ us at really low levels?

I'm sure they are still with us at low levels.

> Where did they come from to begin with?

Acarapis dorsalis and Acarapis externus are mites that lives on honey bees that are indistinguishable from Tracheal mites (Acarapis woodi). They are classified differently simply based on the location where they are found. Leading to the obvious question, are they the same and they are just not able to get into the trachea. The assumption by the Scientists is that one of them made a leap of Evolution and started living in the trachea. Dee Lusby thinks the bees got enlarged enough they could get in. And then they spread...
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Just as you suspected I did not know if I had TM but rather treated as precaution as I was advised. I justified that fumes the from menthol (like that rubbed on a baby's chest) were less than 'medication' however this may be wrong. Can TM develope a resistance to menthal? --- The fumes definately did not make the bees feel at home.
I lost my first round of hives last year after 3 years. I blame my lack of effort by failing to keep new strong queens, failing to recognize weakening hives and once they weakened, failing to adequately help fight the small hive beeltes and wax moths. My original thoughts were that TM and VM contributed to weakening the hive. My attempt to mail dead bees for testing failed when I improperly shipped them so I have no confirmation of infestation. I am now considering that my 3 yr old queens were just too old.
--- Back to this year. I plan on using a fall Apistan treatment for VM even though I may not have a big infestation. Think this is good or bad? How about Fumagilin-B?
Thanks for the good input.
 

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Well, I would have tests done before spending the money for nosema treatments that might not be neccesary. But you can check for their presence yourself by learning how to field strip bees to check the coloration of thier midgut. Look it up.

And as far as varroa mites are concerned, you can look at drone brood or do an ether roll or any other sampling test and determine whether mites are present. I don't know that I would use Apistan though. I don't trust it's efficacy.
 
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