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I don't quite understand what you're asking.
 

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The terms "hard pesticide" and "soft pesticide" mean different things to different people.

Some people define conventional pesticides as "hard." Some people define synthetic pesticides as "hard." Some people define chemicals that kill greater percentages of target organisms "harder."

I think the best definition for a "hard" versus a "soft" pesticide uses the selectivity of the pesticide and the toxicity to non-target organisms.

Of course, using the sort of definition I like, coumaphos and fluvalinate and formic acid and oxalic acid are all "hard." I already know that many beekeepers here will object to that.

Determining whether oxalic acid is "harder" or "softer" than formic acid seems virtually impossible to me. The ranking of such treatments is less important than knowledge of the modes of action and proper treatment methods.

More importantly, consider the risks associated with any type of chemical treatment before making an application.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
My ? came about from the tread that I link to. And that one treatment was referd to as a hard treatment. And I know some are harder than others.
 

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I still say that treatments are either "hard" or "soft," and trying to detect differences in "hardness" between two "hard" chemicals will be almost impossible.
 
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