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Okay, here is the question to those of you that have done it. Did not think about this when I put the top entrances on hives!
I now have top entrances on all my hives and the bees are busy bringing in and evaporating nectar. Now how in the world do you use bee quick in a top entrance hive.
1-Will I have to place the honey laden supers above the top entrance to drive the bees out?
2-Will I have to buy a leaf blower to blow the bees off the supers instead of using Bee Quick?
3-Will I have to brush the bees off instead of using Bee Quick?
Any and all suggestions appreciated!
Thanks
 

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>Now how in the world do you use bee quick in a top entrance hive.

I've never used bee quick. But it's heavier than air isn't it? Do you have SBB? Won't it drive the bees down? If the issue is the bees coming back getting back in the supers, why not start just before dark and set the boxes behind the hives and then wait until most have left. Then drive the rest down with the Beequick.

>1-Will I have to place the honey laden supers above the top entrance to drive the bees out?

Doesn't sound practical.

>2-Will I have to buy a leaf blower to blow the bees off the supers instead of using Bee Quick?

Many people do this.

>3-Will I have to brush the bees off instead of using Bee Quick?

That's what I usually do. After a chilly night there aren't many there anyway.
 

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I will be removing seven shallow supers tomorro for extraction and thought I would use a fume board and bee quick but what MB is suggesting sounds easier. So you are saying Michael that you simply remove the supers and set them to the back of the hives and then wait until after dark? Presumably the bees will go back home and leave the supers clear? That sounds so simple. Theresa.
 

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<<<<why not start just before dark>>>>

And I say FINISH just before dark. You definitely do NOT want to be in the hives at dark, and I am quite sure you won't be a second time. Once is enough to teach the hardest to learn.
 

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ahh, local knowledge

iddee, I'm guessing that setting supers aside and waiting till dark till the bees go home is talking about a climate where it makes sense to wait till cool weather in the fall to rob the bees and use the cool weather to your advantge
I don't think that works around here
how do you chase em out around here?
I suspect they ain't gonna leave on there own
don't most folks harvest the spring crop in the next few weeks??
enlighten us oh veil-less one


Dave

[edit] power napper, didn't mean to hijack your thread
I think your conditions are similar to ours

[ June 01, 2006, 08:29 PM: Message edited by: drobbins ]
 

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Been there, done that.
Hives have lots fewer bees after dark. There may be some house bees that got "lost" but if you start with the bee Quick as you pull the supers off, the housebees will run down into the hive and further reduce the numbers to fly home at dark. Do bear in mind that moths are active at night and will visit the unprotected supers to lay their eggs. Not a problem if you freeze the combs or return them for protection by the strong hives. But if you're going to store them, then be mindful. I try to not leave any comb unguarded outside at night.

Waya
 

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> Now how in the world do you use bee quick in a top entrance hive.

The same way you'd use it with a bottom-entrance hive.
Set the fume board or breeze board atop the uppermost
super, and work your way downwards. You can either
reposition the entrance after removing each super, or
leave it off while you pull supers. You'll be done before
much of a traffic jam develops.


We make Bee-Quick, so I hope you got an instruction sheet
along with your bottle. I know we don't make any special
mention of top-entrance hives, but this is because we don't
need to. The harvesting techniques do not vary between
top entrance and bottom entrance hives.

>> why not start just before dark and set the boxes behind
>> the hives and then wait until most have left. Then drive
>> the rest down with the Beequick.

The problem with this approach is that dark alone is not
going to get the bees to move out of ("abandon") supers
in a reliable manner. A cool evening would have this effect,
but those are in short supply in the June-July timeframe,
and no one who likes honey (or selling honey) wants to leave
supers unharvested all summer when they could harvest now,
and have the bees to refill them again.
"Harvest early, harvest often".

>1-Will I have to place the honey laden supers above the top
> entrance to drive the bees out?

Nope, the bulk of the bees will move downward into the brood
chambers (or, move downward into the supers below the ones
at the top of a large stack). Some folks have Imire shims and all
sorts of other alternative entrances, so you will not be the
first to be working with openings above the brood chamber.
Note that you may well see bees exiting through any such
alternative "upper" entrances, and bearding on the outside of
the hive. This is OK, but if bees start to exit a bottom entrance,
you have used far too much, or left the fume board on too long.

> 2-Will I have to buy a leaf blower to blow the bees off the
> supers instead of using Bee Quick?

Nope.

>3-Will I have to brush the bees off instead of using Bee Quick?

Nope.
 

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The abandonment method is what I always use. I pull the supers at dusk when just a few bees are coming and going. In the early morning (dawn), I pick them up.

There is a catch however. I live in the mountains and our temperature starts dropping much earlier in the day than the valley floor. Our nights are almost always cool(50's). I pull supers when our flow stops about the first of August, but I only have to brush 2-10 bees off of each super in the morning.

However, last year I tried this at my mother-in-laws place. It was a hot day and probably didn't get below 70 that night. The next morning every bee was waiting for us still in the honey super. I suppose 1/4 of the bees had left, but that left a lot. She only lives 100 miles from me, so your locale will be important.

If you don't get cool nights, I don't know if it will work, but it has always worked for me. If you get a cool night, pull a super and see if they don't leave for the brood nest.
 

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>I will be removing seven shallow supers tomorro for extraction and thought I would use a fume board and bee quick but what MB is suggesting sounds easier. So you are saying Michael that you simply remove the supers and set them to the back of the hives and then wait until after dark?

Two caveats. You have to do this when there is a flow and not a dearth and just before dark, not in the middle of the afternoon. Otherwise you may set off a robbing frenzy.

>Presumably the bees will go back home and leave the supers clear? That sounds so simple.

It is.

CC Miller talks about it in 50 years among the bees.
 

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Thanks Michael,
I will try this method this year as it always gets cool at night here in VT. I tried Bee-Quick last year but I don't think it is warm enough here to heat the fume board up enough.(or I just don't know how to use it.) It didn't work well for me and I ended up brushing most of the bees out anyway.
 
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