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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Perhaps this router bit may produce a profile that would be good for comb guiding in top bars or foundationless frames.


I plan to try it, as soon as I can save up enough money to purchase a set. Besides it also looks good to use for the purpose it was originally designed for.
 

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I like the profile alot, but I don't think the router bit would work for precut top bars for safety reasons. You would have to rip cut your top bars after running your stock through the router.

Let us know how it works for you.

Thanks,

Don Semple
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Don,
I was thinking the same thing, it would be safer to cut the profile of the top bars by running a stock blank, pre-cut to length, then run it through the router bit, forming the profile and then cutting off the finished top bar, then repeating the process until the original stock blank was too small to safely continue.
 

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I guess I'm not understanding the problems folks are foreseeing trying to cut guides with this cutter. They put fences on router tables for a reason.

Craftsman used to make (maybe still does, but I haven't seen it marketed) a Bench Saw Molding Set. It was an arbor that fit on your table saw, and it had 3 interchangeable blades for cutting different designs. If you find the tongue and groove blade set, you could use the tongue cutter to cut top bars.

I've seen this cutter sold on eBay pretty cheap before.
 

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That would look good alright, but seriously I've yet to try a comb guide that they wouldn't work with. Popsicle sticks, paint paddles, chamfer strip, or just turning the wedge bar down - all work fine - it just doesn't seem to matter. No need to wax them or anything.

Maybe my bees just aren't picky, but I think I could tape a ball point pen to the top bar and they would draw comb from it. I should try that.
 

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I guess I'm not understanding the problems folks are foreseeing trying to cut guides with this cutter. They put fences on router tables for a reason.
The router bit looks too aggressive to work with small pieces of wood IMHO.

I’m in agreement with Joseph that for safety reason a guy would have to run larger pieces of wood cut to length thru the router first and then rip cut them to the proper thickness second. I would also recommend using a band saw for the rip cutting instead of a table saw (again for safety reasons).

3 fingers left regards ...Don
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I found that "Precision Bits" also makes this bit set. The price at their web site was $29.95 + $6.95 shipping = $36.90, then I noticed that Amazon.com was a supply point for the very same bit set, made by "Precision Bits". Amazon was only charging $24.95 for the bit set, and $6.25 for shipping = $31.20, so I ordered from Amazon, should be here within a week.
 

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That would look good alright, but seriously I've yet to try a comb guide that they wouldn't work with. Popsicle sticks, paint paddles, chamfer strip, or just turning the wedge bar down - all work fine - it just doesn't seem to matter. No need to wax them or anything.

Maybe my bees just aren't picky, but I think I could tape a ball point pen to the top bar and they would draw comb from it. I should try that.
I've been turning the wedge bar down, and am not having a lot of luck. The comb usually gets drawn off center, well to one side and sticking from under the top bar by quite a bit. I'd love to try a more pronounced wedge like this router bit is producing.
 

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The router bit looks too aggressive to work with small pieces of wood IMHO.


How small of a piece is too small? The example strip in the picture is too flimsy of a piece of wood to use as a top bar in a TBH, or as the top bar in a foundationless frame. You'd be using a piece of stock that would likely have 3/4 of an inch of uncut material above the routed portion.

The only way I can think of that someone would use a thin piece like is shown in the picture is if they were nailing it to a frame top bar to use as a guide - but it would be just as easy to nail a piece of preshaped 3/4 crown molding...and that would be a lot less work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Good discussion - lots of interesting ideas.

I like power tools, especially routers, I suppose that's why I came up with the idea to make nice looking comb guides with router bit profiles. I have used several comb guides, including wedge in sideways, and thin strip of wood glued into slot, even a starter strip of foundation in top bar slot. But due to my OCD like tendencies, I need the unity and symmetry of a router bit profile be cut into my top bars, and the same need drove me to select this router bit profile as one that appeared most functional for the purpose.

In no way do I believe my bees absolutely need this as much as I do.

I like my power tools.
 

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It might be worthwhile to see if they make a molding cutter with this design. Some planers you can use as molding cutters by changing the blades with different cutters. You can cut moldings on pretty thin wood by feeding it through the planer.

You can also use a radial arm saw with a molding cutter blade set. Turn the saw 90 degrees, and lock it in position so it can't slide. Use the rail as a fence.

Power tools can be great things.

I know a guy who does some awesome cabinet and fancy woodworking. He refuses to use power routers, due to getting his hand cut up pretty badly by one once. He uses the old fashioned hand planes with blades with fancy designs to cut intricate routered edges. Sometimes he has to grind his own blade profile. Hand tools can be great things too.
 
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