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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I didn't want to post this in the TBH section, because it also suggests "Natural" beekeeping, and frames are a no-no.

I haven't been around a hive yet, and am just trying to soak in information and ask my silly questions before starting one up next year. Please understand that I know very little and am asking a hypothetical question.

I have been reading like crazy and have been watching also sorts of "How To..." videos and was eventually led to BeeSource.com. I saw some photos posted by Cyrus Brewster back in 2009 where he had his TBH bars framed to match the angle of his hive. I messaged him and requested an update but have not received a response yet. Has anyone else tried this?

I believe his intent was to go foundationless, and wanted the frames for the added strength to the comb and to help with extraction. If you modified a standard extractor to fit your triangle-ish frames, you would be able to save your naturally drawn-out comb, and speed up the extraction process...right?

It would seem to my naive and hopeful imagination that the backyard beekeeper could avoid the heavy lifting and overly invasive robbing, have the same convenient extraction process as a langstroth, allow your bees to draw their own comb naturally, and have enough honey to share with friends and family. Your comb would be a standard size and should make it super easy to modify a regular extractor and be able to spin it fast without fear of damaging the comb.

So what have I overlooked? Who has tried this, and who laughs at the notion? I'd love to hear everyone's thoughts, as long as they are meaningful and informative. I welcome the rantings as well, but please remember to include your thought process. Pictures are always VERY appreciated. Thanks!!!
 

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I started with 2 TBH a few years ago. Now all my splits are go into a long lang which is basically a TBH with frames. I like LL better because now I have he convenience of frames and I don't have supers that need to be stored in the winter.
 

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I started with 2 TBH a few years ago. Now all my splits are go into a long lang which is basically a TBH with frames. I like LL better because now I have he convenience of frames and I don't have supers that need to be stored in the winter.
That's a great lead! I didn't realize these two concepts had already been combined. I just watched a couple video featuring LL Hives. Do your frames have gaps at the top when you lift the lid like a tradition Langstroth, or are they butted up to each other like in a TBH?
 

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That's a great lead! I didn't realize these two concepts had already been combined. I just watched a couple video featuring LL Hives. Do your frames have gaps at the top when you lift the lid like a tradition Langstroth, or are they butted up to each other like in a TBH?
They have gaps just like a Langstroth.
 

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Nice thing about a "Longstroth" hive is that you can also put in a follower board to separate the hives and build upwards (so one hive can share multiple colonies). Could also put in several dividers to house numerous nucs (that's my plan) that can share temperature regulation, etc.
 

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Nice thing about a "Longstroth" hive is that you can also put in a follower board to separate the hives and build upwards (so one hive can share multiple colonies). Could also put in several dividers to house numerous nucs (that's my plan) that can share temperature regulation, etc.
When you say "build upwards" do you mean you can place supers on top of the LL hive? I am picturing two deep body supers, one on each end of the LL, and a separator in the center of the main hive where the colonies meet. Is that right?
 
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