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There's one out of England not too long ago, but it isn't very good from what I hear.

Something about shoeless beekeeping or something. heh heh.

Personally, I would suggest looking for books along the lines of bee biology and working with bees along those lines, but, that's just me.

Big Bear
 

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M. Bush's site is great. The thing that sometimes gets lost is that bees are bees and have the same instincts whether they're in a Lang, top bar, or a trash can. If you understand bees' needs and drives, your management will (should) adapt to their needs. They really don't care what they're in, they still need: ventilation, defensibility, storage, etc. And the beek still needs ways to monitor health, ease of inspection, manageable size and weight, a way to harvest, aesthetic considerations, and to enjoy working the colonies enough to stay in beekeeping.
 

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they still need: ventilation, defensibility, storage, etc. And the beek still needs ways to monitor health, ease of inspection, manageable size and weight, a way to harvest, aesthetic considerations, and to enjoy working the colonies enough to stay in beekeeping.
I might disagree with some of this.

I wouldn't say beeks 'need' to have 'easy' means of inspection nor necessarily a means to harvest.

Beeks 'desire' those things, but don't necessarily 'need' them. a means to observe and inspect, be it 'easy' or not is obviously helpful. A method to harvest really only applies if one intends or desires to harvest. if not, then it is relatively un-important.

I do agree with focusing on what bees needs and behaviors are and working within those parameters. Which is why I suggested books on bee biology.

Big Bear
 
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