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So I can be come certified in TN as a Beekeeper Inspector. This will allow me to inspect my bees when I want to move them, inspect someone else's who wants to move their bees, or inspect someone's bees because they just want them checked out. The only inspection that can't be done is for moving bees out of state.

Was surprised that this program even has a reimbursement plan for these inspections. While not a lot of money it makes it not a burden to do the job. $20 per Apiary and $5 per hive. THere is a specific number of frames that must be checked in each hive. (Can check more but statistcally it's not needed and you are just eating into your reimbursement fee.) After a certain number of hives are located in a apiary, you only check a specific percentage of the hives based on the total number of hives in the apiary and/or total hives in all apiaries.

Hope I passed and am looking forward to the chance of doing this. Makes it easier for me to when doing cutouts, trapouts, and swarms. I can legally move the colonies after getting the bees hives. Our association will be able to assist beeks in a 4 county area including our county. (Some counties don't have a beekeepers association or don't want to participate (limited membership/small county, etc).

The law reads that you can't move bees for any reason without an inspection. It's not being inforced but that would include, swarms, cutouts and trapouts. It also includes moving x number of colonies from spot A to spot B which is XX yards away on the same property.

I can't think of a better way to become more knowledgeable about the diseases, problems (queenless/laying worker), pests, and seeing "how not to do work an apiary" or seeing outstanding apiaries and learn from their knowledge.
 

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The law reads that you can't move bees for any reason without an inspection. It's not being inforced but that would include, swarms, cutouts and trapouts.
Which is absolutely insane... who's going to call to get a swarm inspected before hiving it and moving it to your apiary? After that, sure, but not before that. Oh well, if any questions arise, all my swarms were captured at the very spot the hives are sitting on now... that'd be my story, and it's up to the state to prove me wrong.
 

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Basically it taught me the items that are needed when going to do an inspection. To be more observant when visiting an apiary. What to look for when looking in the hive. Using caution to not accidently infect other hives or apiaries. Use the beeks tools, not yours. Let the beek pull out the frames and put them back. (Don't want to be responsibile for killing a queen.) Did I learn anything new, yea. Was a lot of it info that was just being reinforced, yea. We also went over the Apiary laws of TN and the interpretation of some of the laws.

Looking at the hive and the apiary and getting a total picture before making decisions. What to ask the beek for more info.

G3, it is probably they same course. He was going to have 3 days to pick from to take the course but we all attended 1 session. Course is 1 day long. Started around 9 and finished up at an apiary at almost 6:30.
 

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Which is absolutely insane... who's going to call to get a swarm inspected before hiving it and moving it to your apiary? After that, sure, but not before that. Oh well, if any questions arise, all my swarms were captured at the very spot the hives are sitting on now... that'd be my story, and it's up to the state to prove me wrong.
That's why it's not being enforced. The letter of the law is too tightly written. I wouldn't worry about it. Besides who can tell a swarm from a split, package or nuc? No one really. It just depends on how long any of them have been in a hive. I mean a swarm and a 10 day old package could look the same. I wouldn't ask.
 

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Yeah, makes you wonder why they wrote it that way though.

I would have joined you in this course had I known about it ahead of time. I've been calling John's office to try and get the schedule for the course, but didn't get any response from him... and only found out about the course the day after it started. Oh well, maybe next year.
 

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It does sound like a good way to learn more. But th elaws you mention, worry me. I understand the intent of the law, but if they can control how and when you move, whats to say they won't make the same requirement of cows, hogs, horses, etc?
 

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"I would have joined you in this course had I known about it ahead of time. I've been calling John's office to try and get the schedule for the course, but didn't get any response from him... and only found out about the course the day after it started. Oh well, maybe next year. "

This course is not put on by John/UT. It is put on by Mike Studor with the TN Dept of Agriculture. Basically you become an assistant to Mike.
Interesting note about this class. There are 2 different tests that can be taken. One that certifies the beek to be able to inspect and move his/her own hives (pollination). The other that certifies a beek to do the same thing but also inspect other beeks hives/apiaries. Inspections are only done when requested by beek for whatever reason. The requestor is suppose to go through a beekeepers association to get a certified inspector from their association. I believe that we were alloted 8 inspector certifications through our Rutherford County Beekeepers Association. More than that took the test. If more than 8 pass the test only 8 get on the list put all that pass it are certified. Those not on the list are not entitled to payment for inspections. Also I don't think you get the inspection booklet that must be signed by the inspector and the beek. But if you pass the course you are still certified and can use that information when advertising for swarms, cutouts, etc.

"It does sound like a good way to learn more. But th elaws you mention, worry me. I understand the intent of the law, but if they can control how and when you move, whats to say they won't make the same requirement of cows, hogs, horses, etc? "

Chick, this law in TN is specific to bees only. If was written to control the infection of feral and domestic bees from mites, AFB, EFB, and other diseases/pests. Sometimes laws are written without thought to issues like swarms, cutouts, trapouts. Mike did say though that swarms are able to take diseases/pests with them. Makes sense, especially when a hive absconds. I do know that SHBs can be in a swarm. They just tag along for the ride, just like they stay in the cluster during the winter.

Every state that has Apiary laws are not the same but there are efforts under way to get the states to be on the same page. Especially for inspections.

Florida inspection requirements are horrible. Doesn't matter how many apiaries a beek has only a percentage of the total hives have to be examined regardless of where they are located. Meaning the inspection of the total number of hives can be done from just 1 apiary. Now that's a law that is not strict enough.

Alabama law requires that only packages be transported through their state. No nucs, no hives. If caught. everything you have can be confiscated including vehicles, trailers, etc. Tough law. I guess commercial beeks must go north and around Alabama when going east or west. That's a lot of extra travel if you are using I-10 or I-20.

Just tidbits that were included in the class.
does sound like a good way to learn more. But th elaws you mention, worry me. I understand the intent of the law, but if they can control how and when you move, whats to say they won't make the same requirement of cows, hogs, horses, etc? Today 01:40 AM
 

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Discussion Starter #11
"I would have joined you in this course had I known about it ahead of time. I've been calling John's office to try and get the schedule for the course, but didn't get any response from him... and only found out about the course the day after it started. Oh well, maybe next year. "

This course is not put on by John/UT. It is put on by Mike Studor with the TN Dept of Agriculture. Basically you become an assistant to Mike.
Interesting note about this class. There are 2 different tests that can be taken. One that certifies the beek to be able to inspect and move his/her own hives (pollination). The other that certifies a beek to do the same thing but also inspect other beeks hives/apiaries. Inspections are only done when requested by beek for whatever reason. The requestor is suppose to go through a beekeepers association to get a certified inspector from their association. I believe that we were alloted 8 inspector certifications through our Rutherford County Beekeepers Association. More than that took the test. If more than 8 pass the test only 8 get on the list put all that pass it are certified. Those not on the list are not entitled to payment for inspections. Also I don't think you get the inspection booklet that must be signed by the inspector and the beek. But if you pass the course you are still certified and can use that information when advertising for swarms, cutouts, etc.

"It does sound like a good way to learn more. But th elaws you mention, worry me. I understand the intent of the law, but if they can control how and when you move, whats to say they won't make the same requirement of cows, hogs, horses, etc? "

Chick, this law in TN is specific to bees only. If was written to control the infection of feral and domestic bees from mites, AFB, EFB, and other diseases/pests. Sometimes laws are written without thought to issues like swarms, cutouts, trapouts. Mike did say though that swarms are able to take diseases/pests with them. Makes sense, especially when a hive absconds. I do know that SHBs can be in a swarm. They just tag along for the ride, just like they stay in the cluster during the winter.

Every state that has Apiary laws are not the same but there are efforts under way to get the states to be on the same page. Especially for inspections.

Florida inspection requirements are horrible. Doesn't matter how many apiaries a beek has only a percentage of the total hives have to be examined regardless of where they are located. Meaning the inspection of the total number of hives can be done from just 1 apiary. Now that's a law that is not strict enough.

Alabama law requires that only packages be transported through their state. No nucs, no hives. If caught. everything you have can be confiscated including vehicles, trailers, etc. Tough law. I guess commercial beeks must go north and around Alabama when going east or west. That's a lot of extra travel if you are using I-10 or I-20.

Just tidbits that were included in the class.
 
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