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Hey I was looking in one of my hives the other day and it seems that they have too much honey in the brood chamber. I added supers for them to expand into but is it bad for all the honey in the chamber? It seems I have a decent population so should I leave the honey or extract it. Also how do I get the honey on the same frames as the brood out? I haven't been able to look into the hive in a week to check if I need to add a super or if they're going to swarm. Cherries are starting to bloom and Im afraid they need more room but I can't check as often because I just broke my ankle a few days ago. Thanks for the help!
 

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If it were my hive I would pull a couple of frames out of the brood chamber and if I had them, put in some empty drawn comb frames. If I didn't have them I would put in frames (either with foundation or foundationless). It would depend on the amount of bees whether I put another box (super) on. Preferably the super would hold the same size frames as the brood chamber, in which case the 2 frames pulled from the brood chamber would go into the super.
 

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Like the other poster said, you may want to open the broodnest. One of the signs of swarm prep is backfilling the broodnest. if I was concerned about swarming, I would put in empty frames.

You could consider a crush and strain on some of the frames you remove.
 

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You didn't say CAPPED honey. So, we'll assume it's raw nectar. The colony typically puts nectar ahead of expansion in the growth direction, especially when growing latterly, frame to frame, into empty comb in the brood box. That's not a problem in early-season growth. It takes a lot of feed to sustain a growing colony.
No action is required in that circumstance.

Walt
 

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You don't remove honey (or nectar) from frames that have brood on them, that is the food for them to raise brood. You may want to scratch the honey cappings if the middle frames have a solid band of honey across the top.

Also, if there is a good amount of honey or nectar (more than 1/4) on brood frames then you are safe to move a couple of frames that do not have brood up into the super. (Assuming you use all the same size frames.) This will help them to move up into the super.
 
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