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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Inspected one of my hives today and discovered the top deep had ten frames of mostly capped honey. I was surprised by their progress in the last two weeks but now I am concerned the queen is running out of space. The lower deep is fully involved with brood and bees. I saw larvae so I know the queen is laying. There is a medium super on top, added a week ago that is untouched.

I considered putting the medium between the two deeps as there is no brood in the upper deep.
I could also add a regular deep between or leave the super on top.

I am foundationless so they would have a lot of work to do. Ultimately I plan to have a three deep hive, I just was unsure if ther was enough season left to build out a deep. There seems to be a large population and plenty of brood to come.
 

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If you are not looking to harvest honey just throw a deep on and feed. Worst that can happen is they don't draw it all out.
 

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What you describe above in the OP is almost exactly my same situation. The long and the short of it is that I have 2 deeps with a medium on top, and they have all but ignored the medium. I tried fostering it by adding 2 frames of partially capped honey about 6 weeks ago. It seems that they did at least take the time to cap the one full and the one partial frame of honey, but have not drawn anything out on any of the other frames. I mean, frames 1-4 and 7-10 are still just bare foundation. I guess I'm a little bit concerned about the hive being honey bound. Any thoughts on that?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
What I did is add a deep to the middle. I moved 4 frames of brood up to the new box and put a couple frames of honey on the outsides of the bottom and middle deep and arranged the remaining frames of honey above the brood with one or two empty frames between full. Empty f-less frames filled the empty spots and I fed them some 1:1 sugar syrup to encourage them to build comb.

I am new so be careful about taking this as advice, I am going to try a three deep arrangement for this hive. You may want to start a new thread as I got only one response and get suggestions from more experienced beekeepers.
 

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It is extremely difficult to get bees to draw comb this late in the year - you'll be best off finding ways to work with the resources that you have now.

@FollowtheHoney - those deep frames filled with honey are their winter stores. If you are concerned that the bees are running out of room take a frame or two of honey and freeze to give back to the colony at a later date. Replace the frames you took out with empty foundationless frames and see what happens. In Dartmouth, MA your fall flow should be in full swing. I wouldn't feed until it is over.
 

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It is hard, even in the Carolinas, to get bees to draw comb after the solstice for some reason. The girls are still filling drawn comb.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the response. I have already rearranged at this point. I did not add brood to the third deep as I did not want to spread it too thin. When I inspect next I could move the honey frames down and go with a two deep configuration? I would just make sure to leave a couple empties.

I had removed one wonky comb as it had mostly drone brood and I thought it would be 'fun?' To check for mites, and two days later when I did my rearranging they had uncapped some honey frames and were building comb in the one empty frame. I was both concerned by the use of their stores and encouraged that they were still building comb.
 
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