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Discussion Starter #1
One of the most successful threads on BeeSource is "Today in the Apiary" - so I figured: why not start a thread along similar lines: "Today in the Workshop" ?

I'll kick-off by reporting that I've just completed the routine maintenance of eight six-frame nucleus boxes, which is not a size I'm wild about, but despite them having been made from poor quality plywood they still have a couple of season's life left in 'em, so I just patched-up those areas which have begun to delaminate with waterproof glue, followed by a lick of paint. And while that glue and paint was drying, I've been breaking apart a few dozen pallets which I've now begun to use for building some 18-inch Gallup Hives and a few Warre-style boxes.

Pallets come in many forms - my preferred configuration is single-sided, as they're usually the easiest to dismantle.

ideal pallets-1.jpg

The examples shown above have 30mm thick 'stringers' (supporting timbers) with pine 'deck-boards' (or planks) which I've been able to break apart with next to zero damage. But then, I have other pallets of a similar construction with 35mm stringers, the deck-boards of which are made of some kind of white-wood which has a tendency to split when dismantling if not treated with kid gloves - so those planks are being graded as firewood - not everything is worth salvaging ...

But - it sure is a nice feeling to be recycling so much free timber (lumber )... :)
LJ
 

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Mutts.
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Nice idea for a thread! Sadly did not build anything today:shhhh: Did visit a Rockler store for the very first time so that should count for something:)

Agree with you about the single sided pallets being easiest to disassemble. Not having the side slots in the stringers is a plus as well. Normally am not allowed to bring home pallets from work as they are sold back for recycle. Got lucky for awhile last year when no one was buying them and we were briefly allowed to take them. So snagged about 50. Some single sided but unfortunately hard rough sawn. Machinery crates are often dressed lumber so I keep my eye out for them.
 

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I worked at converting a table from an old band saw to make a router table. Was given a router that had crashed the spindle lock mechanism and now sports a hole in the end cap to slip in a separate tool to grab the shaft. Next is to make a fence. It is handy to have two routers set up for making frames so you dont have to swap and re adjust bits for making the 3/4 and 5/8 cutouts for top and bottom bars.
 

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Great idea, LJ!

Too bad, I still did not have time to cut and staple a batch of my new experimental frames.
Next weekend now - fingers crossed.

ONLY if I can tolerate working outside - my shop is completely outside, under a tree.
The next weekend shows to only be up to 45F (but sunny).

Cold weather is coming and my backyard shop is soon to close for the season.
I should post a pic of my migratory, seasonal workshop!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Just to keep the pot boiling ...

There are several methods for installing 'smaller frames' (meaning shorter top-bars) inside full-sized boxes, ranging from strapping them to plain top bars with cable-ties;, using individual 'adapter frames'; or fitting boxes with rebates (rabbets) on all four sides so that full-length frames can be fitted length-wise with shorter frames cross-wise - but here's another method I came up with:



All that's required is to make a pair of full-sized dummies, each with an appropriate rebate (rabbet)-sized shoulder - I think this is an original idea - "Patent Pending". Ha Ha. :)

... and showing how even more dummies can be used to fill up any voids.



When not required for this purpose, the box can then still be used for it's original purpose, and the dummies can still be used as ordinary dummies.

Dummies and even more dummies - I'm sure there's a joke there somewhere.
LJ
 

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GregV " my shop is completely outside, under a tree."

Around here, especially for working on boats and things all winter, I have discovered the benefits of making metal tubular hoops to repalce temproary wooden frames. I also use the approach for solving several gardening issues. Look up "High Tunnels" which are basically plastic film covered hoops. You can find lots of information at Johnnys Seeds ( Maine) for smaller applications and tools for bending tubes and installation methods. It is portable and simple and cheap; uses 10 foot EMT tubing or top rails for fences ( all at Home Depot - EMT is good galvanized stuff for electrical applications . I am planning on covering an old farm tractor this way so I can slowly rebuild it.

I also thinking of a space for hive boxes and frames in the sun, all winter as a storage method.
 

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One of the most successful threads on BeeSource is "Today in the Apiary" - so I figured: why not start a thread along similar lines: "Today in the Workshop" ? LJ
Similar to the UK Bee Forum. Actually, Today in the apiary is an idea from the UK Forum...What did you do in the apiary today. I suggested to Barry we add Today in the apiary. Its become quite popular
 

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.........
Cold weather is coming and my backyard shop is soon to close for the season.
I should post a pic of my migratory, seasonal workshop!
Saturday was warm but insanely windy to work the wood.
Instead, I harvested some veg.
Yesterday, I almost opened up my shop for few hours - and still did not (too cold for my chronic bronchitis to be standing around the tools).
Instead, spent the time processing my garden harvest.

Still hoping for a tolerable weekend to cut some wood to get ahead for the spring.
When the weather is right, I much prefer to be working in the fresh air (or not be working at all).
Of course, the real issue is the lack of space!
20201018_165736.jpg
 

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GregV " my shop is completely outside, under a tree."
...... Look up "High Tunnels" which are basically plastic film covered hoops. ........
Hey Robert,
My real issue is space.

What you are saying is indeed a no-brainer solution.
But for my 0.25 acre suburban property, the space is the most limiting factor.
Of course, I did this to myself, but it was an OK compromise and I don't regret.

Those hoops needs some space to stand them up.
Of course, I have this veg garden which is empty off-season I could setup some hoops and the shop in them, but...
I don't care to compact the soil too much - it will be just another self-inflicted headache to deal with later.
 

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6a 3rd yr 5 production hives 1/ 2 q resource hive
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Rudimentary carpentry skills here- Getting my feeding shims ready to go over inner cover (that has hole in center). Need to build another one with wood from our local builders supply and #8 hardware cloth stapled over the top. If I can do it you can do it. Scooping out winter pattie feed from MannLake (on top of wax paper). Will also be putting sponge on the inside to spritz water on during winter. You know how I feel about water in winter... Also inserting a picture of my messy work bench. Built from scratch with my boyfriend. Rolling locking casters on the bottom of the legs to make it easy to roll around. I don't have an enclosed garage. Just a carport and overhang so I make due.
 

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One of the most successful threads on BeeSource is "Today in the Apiary" - so I figured: why not start a thread along similar lines: "Today in the Workshop" ?

I'll kick-off by reporting that I've just completed the routine maintenance of eight six-frame nucleus boxes, which is not a size I'm wild about, but despite them having been made from poor quality plywood they still have a couple of season's life left in 'em, so I just patched-up those areas which have begun to delaminate with waterproof glue, followed by a lick of paint. And while that glue and paint was drying, I've been breaking apart a few dozen pallets which I've now begun to use for building some 18-inch Gallup Hives and a few Warre-style boxes.

Pallets come in many forms - my preferred configuration is single-sided, as they're usually the easiest to dismantle.

View attachment 58703

The examples shown above have 30mm thick 'stringers' (supporting timbers) with pine 'deck-boards' (or planks) which I've been able to break apart with next to zero damage. But then, I have other pallets of a similar construction with 35mm stringers, the deck-boards of which are made of some kind of white-wood which has a tendency to split when dismantling if not treated with kid gloves - so those planks are being graded as firewood - not everything is worth salvaging ...

But - it sure is a nice feeling to be recycling so much free timber (lumber )... :)
LJ
One of the most successful threads on BeeSource is "Today in the Apiary" - so I figured: why not start a thread along similar lines: "Today in the Workshop" ?

I'll kick-off by reporting that I've just completed the routine maintenance of eight six-frame nucleus boxes, which is not a size I'm wild about, but despite them having been made from poor quality plywood they still have a couple of season's life left in 'em, so I just patched-up those areas which have begun to delaminate with waterproof glue, followed by a lick of paint. And while that glue and paint was drying, I've been breaking apart a few dozen pallets which I've now begun to use for building some 18-inch Gallup Hives and a few Warre-style boxes.

Pallets come in many forms - my preferred configuration is single-sided, as they're usually the easiest to dismantle.

View attachment 58703

The examples shown above have 30mm thick 'stringers' (supporting timbers) with pine 'deck-boards' (or planks) which I've been able to break apart with next to zero damage. But then, I have other pallets of a similar construction with 35mm stringers, the deck-boards of which are made of some kind of white-wood which has a tendency to split when dismantling if not treated with kid gloves - so those planks are being graded as firewood - not everything is worth salvaging ...

But - it sure is a nice feeling to be recycling so much free timber (lumber )... :)
LJ
One word of caution with using random wood pallets. Here in the Northeast, specifically NYC, NY and Philly, we have been getting a blight of invasive insect species, the Asian Longhorn Beetle, Spotted Lantern Fly and others. They have been entering borrowed in pallet lumber from Asia and are extremely dangerous to our native hardwoods. Personally, I think a requirement should be put in place to contain and burn all of the foreign pallets. The States and Ports are now spending a lot of money trying to eradicate them but the horse is out of the barn and we're pretty much screwed. They are a threat to our environment and millions of trees-they will eventual spread west and southward. Cheap or free wood may not be the best deal. Keep in mind that when these ships dock here, many are put on trains for delivery where you live.
 

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Well i took inventory of all the misc equipment i have so i can make a list of what to build this winter and built a frame assembly jig. Does that count?
 

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Taking inventory is good. Nothing like going into spring and discovering you are short a few telescoping tops. I would swear I had 20 of them, honest!
 

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Taking inventory is good. Nothing like going into spring and discovering you are short a few telescoping tops. I would swear I had 20 of them, honest!
Yep thats what i am doing now... Im using palmer style divided boxes for nucs and i need to build some more 4 frame supers. Im also gonna build some bottoms and tops for those same 4 framers so i can use them separately as well... 2 uses for the same boxes. I am gonna try some 10 frame double screen boards for early splits as well. Im always game to try something new and learn.
 

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Made progress on seven insulated telescoping covers I started months ago. In the south so do not really need insulation but had a bunch of scrap foam and did need covers. Foam (pink & blue stuff) is trapped between lauan and 23/32 moisture-resistant premium sub-flooring (they were out of Advantech that day) so the bees can not get to it. Actually started 10 but ran out of scrap 3/4 board I have scrounged through the years. One board I have had since the 80s! The seven that are almost done only need a second coat of linseed oil and the metal flashing bent and stapled on.

Had enough rippings from wider boards to make three feeder shims which will free up medium suppers which I hope to need next year. Chemical free aspiring TF so who knowso_O Plan to start feeding again and pulled feeders today to clean them. Oh, think these shims will eliminate the need for an inner cover which is something else I'm short on.

Not workshop related but discovered today my Lyson jacket has black mildew stains. Funny how back in the spring I would carefully dry it after each use then fold it and store it in a plastic tote. Now I just throw the sweaty thing in the storage building when I'm done.
 

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Joined a lawsuit regarding the fire that burned down my apiary, workshop, and home. Laid out a plan for financial recovery for my crowdfunding effort, and applying for housing. Later tonight I'll assemble a "super horse" (a folding, portable, rectangular sawhorse to hold honey supers at a convenient height and save my back) for which I have already cut all the members, just need to drill, glue, and bolt. Oh, yes - it is 3 supers wide, the inside has two rails for holding up to 30 frames, a tool rack, and an umbrella stand on the outside corner. It makes working a drop of beehives a pleasure.

Tomorrow will make a "nucleus seat" - a short stool with a storage drawer and room for the smoker bucket - for queen rearing season. It saves the knees a lot of wear and tear.

Hopefully tomorrow will also see my the first part of my beehive identification branding iron welded. It's made of old railroad spikes and forms a large "KC" with a CNC machined piece that reads, "kilocharlie's honeybees and orchard management" underneath it, plus one that has my county beekeeper identification number sized for the frames. Next week's plan is a 5-frame solar wax melter.

Please excuse me, I have to get back to the mathematics of adding up the fire damage bill and filling out my application. Cheers to all, and keep those saws buzzing like a rosemary patch in full bloom!
 

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BTW, does anyone have a blueprint for a really good large radial extractor? I'm thinking 60 frames to maybe 144 frames, and will eventually build a second one when the apiary comes up to needing the speed. I'm in the planning and gathering stage for a year or three down the road.

I can draft up something on my own, but I well know the advantages of a well-thought-out existing design that has already gone through some excellent revisions to the finer details by guys who use them a lot.

Thank you and cheers!
 

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Mutts.
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Hopefully tomorrow will also see my the first part of my beehive identification branding iron welded. It's made of old railroad spikes and forms a large "KC" with a CNC machined piece that reads, "kilocharlie's honeybees and orchard management" underneath it, plus one that has my county beekeeper identification number sized for the frames.
If you don't mind me asking, how much did that set you back? Too small to afford any of the custom brands I have run across at bee vendors. Not really done any thorough searching yet.

Related, working on an idea for uniquely identifing each hive. Have seen others buy cattle 'ear tags' for this. Since I work in shipping & receiving have been saving used truck seals for the past week. Suprising how often you will find one or more broken seals just inside the back door where the driver threw them. Random names of companies and a 7 or 8 digit number. Plan to rout a shallow groove with a dove-tail bit and epoxy them in.
 

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Set me back a whole lot...I had to walk almost 250 yards along the tracks to find the spikes, had to put them into a vise, had to hacksaw them, had to grind them shiny so the welds would not be polluted with rust, had to bend a couple of them into the letter "C". I had to make a few more to weld sideways over the letters so they would be connected together, and had to belt sand a large, extra-long hex nut to weld to the sideways pieces for attaching the handle, a round construction rod with a thread already cut into it. So maybe a whole dollar.

If you really want to save some more money, skip the CNC machining (I work in a shop), and get some smaller steel stock, maybe 3/4" x 1/8" x 4 feet long (heavier material is recommended if you are going to do a lot of hives - try and see what you can work with your tools, and try to make one made small enough to brand a frame), sand or grind it all shiny, cut and hammer and bend you letters and numbers - I use a vise, several kinds of pliers, cheater pipes, pry bars, hammers, punches, even drills to form the letters. Then, line them up and make a connector bar to weld across them. Weld them all together - a TIG setup will leave really clean welds, a MIG setup is perhaps easiest, even oxy-acetylene will suffice, and practice on some scrap until your welder is all adjusted and your weld puddles are looking good - and you have a branding iron. The last step is to file the business end flat.

Remember to place the letters right-side-up on the welding table, arranged as you want them to read, then weld the connecting bar over them, then weld the handle on top of it. The business end is facing down as when you are branding, leaving the print so it isn't backwards.

A 6-inch long, 1/2 inch diameter round handle can be set into a drill press and heated with a torch and a whole bunch of boards can be branded in sequence rather quickly, either before or after assembly. I like to do it before assembly and brand both inside and outside of my hives on all 4 sides.

BTW, it is not a bad idea to add your PERMANENT phone number to your brand. Don't use your cell number - the doggarned phone companies will sometimes change your cell phone number without your permission. That was an expensive lawsuit for me, and if I ever find the jerk who did it to me he'll start having rotten luck for the rest of his life.
 

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Mutts.
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So maybe a whole dollar.
LOL! I'm sure I could muddle my way through making a few large letters from 1/8" stock as you describe. Not 'artsy craftsy' enough to do a couple of sentences of smaller letters to go with it.

Know what you mean about the backwards forwards issue. Used to work in a plastics factory and we had to use (less common) non-reversed letter stamps to stamp molds. Takes a bit of 'thought' to stamp backwards so it will read correct in the finished part.
 
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