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OAV twice will do nothing to help with your mite population.

Formic acid and oxalic acid are two of the best treatments available, and the issue with formic is that it kills queens, and brood

Also OAV costs next to nothing, and formic acid is extremely expensive if one has more than a handful of colonies.
 

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Also OAV costs next to nothing, and formic acid is extremely expensive if one has more than a handful of colonies.
You can say that again-I just bought a 30 dose box-$150 !!! I still like it better at this time of year because it does get under the caps-one and done! This should get me through to mid-September and I'll resume with some OAV if and when needed. Word of caution-just don't throw this any any other treatment on the hives with out testing first. I'm pretty much at a point where I think sugar rolls are a waste of time and risky. Alcohol washes are the gold standard and when done properly, give the best results. We start harvest next week here and I'm figuring while I have the hives open, I'll test and anything over 3/100 will get formic

We did hit a cool spell here on the east coast, high around 80 and nights just touching upper 50's, seems like thunderstorms over night giving a pretty good drenching to the ground a few nights a week. With the clover coming to an end here (and my wife forced me to cut the lawn!) they seem to be on something else but I can figure out what. Been driving around looking at the trees and field, lots of back eyes, other yellow flowers and daisies but I don't think that they are big nectar suppliers. I put a feeder with 2:1 on one of the smaller and last swarm hive that I caught in mid June. They've been at 5 frames (deep) for a months or so, the queen is laying and the girls are very active but they're just not building comb at any break neck speed. The five frames are loaded with bees and brood. Even with the flow right now, my thoughts are getting ready for fall and I guess we'll see if she makes it.
 

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Been driving around looking at the trees and field, lots of back eyes, other yellow flowers and daisies but I don't think that they are big nectar suppliers.
I think the black eye susans are actually a decent supply. I have been seeing bees on mine, and I have an alkali bee colony that established itself under my black eye susans. I have also seen my bees in squash flowers recently.
 

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well, the hive that I caught swarming earlier this year decided they wanted to supercede the queen this week. I was not planning on having hives raise new queens this time of year, but I assume that they know what they are doing
 

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OAV series started on 8/4. The bee year 2022 starts now. Goal is mites to near 0. 3 days apart. At first DDC I'm below 1 percent infestation all colonies. New fan girl for Figwort. In addition to my beloved phacelia I'm loving how Figwort draws a wide body of pollinators including the tiny ones. Foliage is a "meh" but geez it's popular. Another honorable mention is Honeywort.

September is all about lunatic feeding. I get so schizophrenic in September. Have I fed enough? Could I feed more? Take feed off, now put it back on. Not strong enough to put it on a scale.
 

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Did some inspections today, 3 bee yards, 15 hives and I'm going to guess we're in a dearth. It seems like most of the established hives had not expanded much into the second super since my last look a couple, few weeks ago. The "in-town" ones seem to be doing much better than the ones hosted at a friend's farm but are not up to what we saw this time over the last two years where all were at a third super being half capped. This year, the "in-town" are still in the second super, maybe 70% but the farm's are looking just finishing the first and starting the second with white comb on the bottom of a couple frames. At the farm, after opening 7 of the 9 hives there, number 8 went full mad-dog psycho attack-20 bees on each glove going wild stinging! After finishing the inspection on 8, I passed on 9 and they chased me for 100 feet over 10 minutes-full mad dog! Definitely a dearth here and this hive had 80% comb on the first super, half capped and these girls weren't giving up nothin'. Out of the nine hives there, two are late splits doing well and one was a late swarm doing well but there was no expectation of a harvest on them this year. The intown hives on the other hand, around 80% comb, 60% capped on the second super and a third super in place. I'm guessing the ornamental gardens with non-native flowers and constant watering is keeping theses going for now. I'm finding it interesting of the performance between an agriculture/forested area verses the artificial i-town environment. I'm going to smoke my jacket later (due to all the sting phenomes now in it) and then check my farm and up on the ridge this afternoon.
 

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Did some inspections today, 3 bee yards, 15 hives and I'm going to guess we're in a dearth. It seems like most of the established hives had not expanded much into the second super since my last look a couple, few weeks ago. The "in-town" ones seem to be doing much better than the ones hosted at a friend's farm but are not up to what we saw this time over the last two years where all were at a third super being half capped. This year, the "in-town" are still in the second super, maybe 70% but the farm's are looking just finishing the first and starting the second with white comb on the bottom of a couple frames. At the farm, after opening 7 of the 9 hives there, number 8 went full mad-dog psycho attack-20 bees on each glove going wild stinging! After finishing the inspection on 8, I passed on 9 and they chased me for 100 feet over 10 minutes-full mad dog! Definitely a dearth here and this hive had 80% comb on the first super, half capped and these girls weren't giving up nothin'. Out of the nine hives there, two are late splits doing well and one was a late swarm doing well but there was no expectation of a harvest on them this year. The intown hives on the other hand, around 80% comb, 60% capped on the second super and a third super in place. I'm guessing the ornamental gardens with non-native flowers and constant watering is keeping theses going for now. I'm finding it interesting of the performance between an agriculture/forested area verses the artificial i-town environment. I'm going to smoke my jacket later (due to all the sting phenomes now in it) and then check my farm and up on the ridge this afternoon.
LB

sometime the differences in yards are striking.
I suggest keeping notes.
I have one I an leaving this year, too many issues.

add yards where the going id good, cull where they do poorly.

All places are not created equal. glad to see someone else notice.

GG
 

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GG-
I always appreciate your advice and have been keeping a spread sheet along with a field notebook on all of the hives and yards. I've been adding data to each file on the locations and hive including the terrain (wooded/meadow/ornamental gardens) elevation (they have an app for that) and a weather tracking conformed by local NOAA weather stations (we have more than one would think necessary-University folk) After doing another round of inspections on the ones I missed last week I will confirm that the "in-town" yards are at least a super ahead of the country cousins from the same batch of Spring nucs. Seems like the "in-town" non-native plants along with the watering has created an artificial flow that the Farms outside of town aren't seeing. Rain has definitely affected the flows but NOAA says we're ahead on average rain but this July, it's 2-3 storms of an 1-1/2 to 3+ inches rather than 1/2" overnight every 2-3 days that's more common. It's also been very hot here-low-mid 90's (Texas guys may laugh) but cooling into around 80 next week. Both Farms have year round water sources, a small stream at mine and a spring fed bog (pppprobably an old farm pond silted in)at my friend's but are not utilized for irrigation . While elevation differences are only approximately 80' MSL to around 400' MSL at the friend's farm , it appears to have little impact. I think it all comes down to rain that creates flow.

Harvest next week.
LB
 

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I think the planted flowers in residential areas do help a lot. I suspect you get annuals that typically dont make it on farms, plants that need more attention (Water) so they don't grow wild, and more flowering trees.
 

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GG-
I always appreciate your advice and have been keeping a spread sheet along with a field notebook on all of the hives and yards. I've been adding data to each file on the locations and hive including the terrain (wooded/meadow/ornamental gardens) elevation (they have an app for that) and a weather tracking conformed by local NOAA weather stations (we have more than one would think necessary-University folk) After doing another round of inspections on the ones I missed last week I will confirm that the "in-town" yards are at least a super ahead of the country cousins from the same batch of Spring nucs. Seems like the "in-town" non-native plants along with the watering has created an artificial flow that the Farms outside of town aren't seeing. Rain has definitely affected the flows but NOAA says we're ahead on average rain but this July, it's 2-3 storms of an 1-1/2 to 3+ inches rather than 1/2" overnight every 2-3 days that's more common. It's also been very hot here-low-mid 90's (Texas guys may laugh) but cooling into around 80 next week. Both Farms have year round water sources, a small stream at mine and a spring fed bog (pppprobably an old farm pond silted in)at my friend's but are not utilized for irrigation . While elevation differences are only approximately 80' MSL to around 400' MSL at the friend's farm , it appears to have little impact. I think it all comes down to rain that creates flow.

Harvest next week.
LB
agree rain/ "sprinklers" is a big differentiator.
In out town they planted decretive pears on the streets, so there is bloom there. and the yards do have an abundance of plantings which add diversity so I would tend to agree the burbs may be a better place for the bees.
Glad to hear you are keeping notes. track queen mating sucess as well.
I have a yard that is really bad for mating and good for flow?? not sure the issue there.
some places can be abandoned and some have hives added, all to help the bees health, and need less feed.

glad you have some good places proving up.

GG
 

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Kind of found this interesting this morning. Weather had cooled down so I popped open (bad term) about 10 hives in 3 different yards as a pre-harvest assessment on quantity. A few over wintered hives looked good, 2-1/2 boxes capped and they each got another super to give some ventilation (along with a continued dream of a massive flow in the next week or two) but the first year hives are very much less impressive. What I found unusual is that one "mini-yard" of three hives, one hive was building out a third box nicely and then the other two barely had anything going in the first box-all three sitting on a six foot long bench so they're pretty close together. All were sourced a set up together and all three had similar large population on double deeps. The two less productive had serious bearding over the past week but were vented up top, the productive one had little and kept flying like there is no tomorrow. With the cool down, all 10 hives were pretty chill, no aggressive beehaviour. I'm thinking 75-100 pounds on all of the over wintered hives this summer and maybe 30-75 pounds out of the established nuc hives. We usually have a good fall flow with knapweed, aster and goldenrod so maybe another 25-50 pounds each leaving the broods at 100 pounds. I'm leaving the splits and swarms alone but most of them are in double deeps, pretty well filled out. It appeared that hives given frames with built our extracted comb did much better, beyond the old frames than any of the hives with just wax coated foundations. Just think it's a little strange that there's that much difference between three hives next to each other. I guess bees will be bees. At least I'm starting to formulate which hives will be requeened and which will be split next spring. The more I do this beekeeping this the more i realize I know very little.
 

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Kind of found this interesting this morning. Weather had cooled down so I popped open (bad term) about 10 hives in 3 different yards as a pre-harvest assessment on quantity. A few over wintered hives looked good, 2-1/2 boxes capped and they each got another super to give some ventilation (along with a continued dream of a massive flow in the next week or two) but the first year hives are very much less impressive. What I found unusual is that one "mini-yard" of three hives, one hive was building out a third box nicely and then the other two barely had anything going in the first box-all three sitting on a six foot long bench so they're pretty close together. All were sourced a set up together and all three had similar large population on double deeps. The two less productive had serious bearding over the past week but were vented up top, the productive one had little and kept flying like there is no tomorrow. With the cool down, all 10 hives were pretty chill, no aggressive beehaviour. I'm thinking 75-100 pounds on all of the over wintered hives this summer and maybe 30-75 pounds out of the established nuc hives. We usually have a good fall flow with knapweed, aster and goldenrod so maybe another 25-50 pounds each leaving the broods at 100 pounds. I'm leaving the splits and swarms alone but most of them are in double deeps, pretty well filled out. It appeared that hives given frames with built our extracted comb did much better, beyond the old frames than any of the hives with just wax coated foundations. Just think it's a little strange that there's that much difference between three hives next to each other. I guess bees will be bees. At least I'm starting to formulate which hives will be requeened and which will be split next spring. The more I do this beekeeping this the more i realize I know very little.
some may have swarmed, or superceded.
or even had a poorer queen.

of 4 NUCs i bought 2 have 1 super and 2 have 4 in the same yard.
each is unique, odd but typical.

GG
 

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These are not very good pictures, but one of my hives mixed wet and dry cappings on the same frames. These were empty foundation less frames this spring, and the bees drew them out and filled them. The wet part was capped later and is thicker, but it was all drawn out and filled in a few months. I figured it was interesting to share since this sounds semi uncommon.

65050


65051
 

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My complacency got the best of me - a massive swarm was hanging on a low branch at an out apiary.

A few others are getting ready to swarm right now.
 

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My complacency got the best of me - a massive swarm was hanging on a low branch at an out apiary.

A few others are getting ready to swarm right now.
Perhaps some beekeeping instruction would help you avoid late season swarms so close to northern freeze up.
Fortunately many commercial operators who overwinter in the cold states stock queens into September to make winter nucs with or replace 3 year old production queens with so some should be available.
Those northern cold country survivor queens in the tag line don't seem to be worth a hoot, they're acting like southern honey making Italians.
 

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interesting,
wet to dry did that mean a queen change?
some say the wet or dry is race related.

GG

nope, this was a single queen and a single hive all season. I think it may have to due with when they decided to cap it.

The history of this hive was I added 2 supers with 9x drawn plastic foundation frames (per box) in april/may time frame. In june I added 8 empty foundationless frames. I checkerboard the foundation less frames in between the mostly capped frames in the supers. In July (I think) I added 9 more framed with plastic foundation that were not drawn out. I think the top/dry part of these mixed capping frames were drawn out and capped earlier in the season, then I put them next to undrawn/less drawn out frames, and the bees kept drawing out and wet capping the bottom. The wet cappings are about 1/4" thicker than the dry cappings. I had several (3-5) of the foundationless frames have mix of wet and dry cappings on atleast one side.
 

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Mites are bad in the apiary near the dwindling/dead outs from neighbors this year.

Would be great if they'd start treating - I guess they just like purchasing bees.

Every so often neighbors do this - I can always tell there's something amiss when I see spikes in mite counts.

Sure enough the neighbors hives are pretty well all dead at this point - no entrance reducers on them - he probably thinks that my bees robbing out his are still living colonies.
 

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I checked the bottom boards again - wow the mite levels are worse than I've seen them in years.

Glad I've been treating because these would be dead hives come fall.
 
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