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Hello from the UK, my name is Iain and I have been a Beekeeper for just over 3 years.
I live in a small village near King's Lynn in Norfolk.
We are surrounded by farmland and orchards so it is very good for our bees to forage.

I have a question to ask;

Can anybody tell me if there is any advantage by adding many supers to a hive rather than removing individual supers once they are full and replacing with an empty super?
 

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Welcome to Beesource!

Can anybody tell me if there is any advantage by adding many supers to a hive rather than removing individual supers once they are full and replacing with an empty super?
One disadvantage to harvesting supers one at a time is that you have to setup (and clean up) your extracting equipment multiple times instead of just once per season.
 

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We only have 7 hives and we inspect weekly and what you say makes a lot of sense.
Could it also mean that a hive with many supers is more prone to robbing?
I imagine the down side to taking off one super at ta time is that extractors have to be set up, then cleaned and then set up again etc...
Not a problem for us I have to say as our hives are in the front garden behind a hedge and only having 7 hives, and being retired, setting up, cleaning etc is not a problem.
Thank you for your reply.
 

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I do agree Rader but as we only have 7 hives we really do not find that an issue.

Thank you for your reply.
 

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Welcome,
Tall hives are more apt to be toppled, there is a larger space for the bees to have to deal with but doing it that way allows a one time removal and extraction.

Since we have separate times of flows where I live, separated by dearth, when leaving suppers on throughout the dearth you stand the chance of the bees consuming a significant portion of the honey. Also after our fall flow we have a super goldenrod flow, goldenrod has a distinctive smell that some find unpleasant. It also crystalizes easily. However I have some customers who claim it is the best cooking honey and prefer it. So I always extract before the goldenrod bloom. then again after and keep it separate.
None of this may be applicable to you. So how, why, and when one extracts is as individual as the beekeeper.
 

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robbing and defending against pests can become problems if there is too much space in the hive for the bees to patrol. i find myself transferring supers from some hives to other hives as needed to make the space manageable for the colonies.
 
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