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I had a lot of trouble finding actual Thymol by itself. You always get Thyme essential oil, which isn't quite the same thing...

At any rate, use the Apiguard. It's easy, it's a measured dose, and it's not expensive.
 

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Hi Wayne,
That part was a little bit of a joke.
But I have put it in my smoker & had higher than normal mite drops on those inspections.
 

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I had a lot of trouble finding actual Thymol by itself. You always get Thyme essential oil, which isn't quite the same thing...

At any rate, use the Apiguard. It's easy, it's a measured dose, and it's not expensive.
Yes, it is pretty much the same thing as thymol is derived from thyme oil. Brother. :rolleyes:

Thymol (also known as 2-isopropyl-5-methylphenol), (IPMP) is a monoterpene phenol derivative of cymene, C10H14O, isomeric with carvacrol, found in oil of thyme.
 

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Hi Wayne,
That part was a little bit of a joke.
But I have put it in my smoker & had higher than normal mite drops on those inspections.
You had my hopes up for free thymol. I have lots of it growing in the garden and around the hives.

There must be a simple method of distilling it. After all, the ancient Egyptions were making it thousands of years ago to use in embalming.

Wayne
 

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making essential oils from herbs is not as easy as ordering a box of Apiguard.

The two main ways would be by solvent extraction or distillation. And as mentioned above you would be getting thyme oil, not thymol.

First plant about a quarter acre of thyme, then harvest it,.....
 

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"Commercial grade" thyme oil is made with thymol crystal and a carrier oil (I learned yesterday); while the pure and organic oils are distilled products.

If the info is accurate on: http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/t/thygar16.html the "chief constituents are from 20 to 25 per cent of the phenols Thymol and Carvacrol, rising in rare cases to 42 per cent."

While some people would be against the use of thyme oil or thymol, the only treatment I give is thymol in the fall feeding, "à la Randy Oliver". I may move away from that as well.

Thyme oil is certainly easier to find but with the variable (and unknown) thymol content of oils I would feel more confident with the solution made with thymol crystal.

I may double the alcohol (and the dosage) to see if it helps the mixture blend with the syrup (in September/October).

Apiguard is also easy to buy but I've read that brood can be harmed and that bees sometimes pour out of the hives to escape the vapors.
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someone suggested using half a tray of Apiquard once a week for three weeks. That is what I did this fall with excellent results. Weather was very warm but it didn't run them out. Brood looked OK, but who can say if any damage was done?
 

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I'm looking into the mail regulations...

As a Class 8 "corrosive", it is looking like Thymol crystal could be mailed as a "ORM-D" package, "Other Regulated Materials-Domestic" Consumer commodity.

From chapter 601 of the US Domestic Mail Manual:

10.19.2 Mailability

Corrosives are prohibited in international mail. A corrosive that can qualify as an ORM-D material is permitted in domestic mail via air or surface transportation subject to these limitations:
a. Liquid Corrosive. A liquid mixture must be 1 pint or less and must contain 15% or less corrosive material with the remainder of the mixture not being a hazardous material, unless otherwise specified for a specific corrosive material. Primary receptacles must be securely sealed compatible glass bottles that are enclosed within securely sealed metal or plastic secondary containers. The secondary container must be packed within a strong outer shipping container that does not exceed 25 pounds per mailpiece.
b. Solid Corrosive. A solid mixture must be 10 pounds or less per primary receptacle and must contain 10% or less corrosive material with the remainder of the mixture not being a hazardous material, unless otherwise specified for a specific corrosive solid. The primary receptacle(s) and secondary container must be securely sealed compatible siftproof containers packed in strong outer shipping container. The total weight of a mailable solid corrosive cannot exceed 25 pounds per mailpiece.

A local Postmaster is looking at this and will be getting back to me. It may "simply" be a matter of specific packaging and labeling.

Gee, buying a scale and dropping little padded envelopes in the mail would have been easy...
 
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