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I put the whole box in a freezer for two days but apparently, it is advisable to freeze the frames separately.
 

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It just means that the frames get re-infested just the same if your don't store them properly.
No point to freeze if you let them to be re-infested. :)
 

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What did you do after you took them out of the freezer and how long was it before you took those pics? It sure is dissapointing when all that valuable comb gets ruined! Are you in GA? Your profile does not say....
 

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I have frozen boxes, then put them in sealed plastic bags and it has worked for me to store them long term.
 

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I'm lucky I've never seen a wax moth before.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What did you do after you took them out of the freezer and how long was it before you took those pics? It sure is dissapointing when all that valuable comb gets ruined! Are you in GA? Your profile does not say....
I put the box and frame in a black plastic bag and put that in a plastic box in my basement. This box came from a hive that got robbed out in mid-September, so it had been about a month and a half since I opened the box. And yes I am in Georgia. I was hoping to save this box of comb for a split next spring but that not happening now. How would y'all recommend cleaning these frames?
 

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I put the box and frame in a black plastic bag and put that in a plastic box in my basement.
Plastic will not reliably stop them.
I say 50/50 - from the experience.
That plastic needs to have some chemical reppellent inside too.
 

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Your best bet would have been to stood the box up on its end on the bottom board and put the cover over it to keep the bottom board dry. Wax moths don’t like the sunlight. I tried the freeze and store in my basement for a few years. Lost pretty much everything that had brood comb in it every time.
 

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Just take your hive tool and scrape everything down.

Put in some fresh foundation and you are good to go.

They can do some damage to the point of even trashing the frame from a structural stand point.

BTa works good to keep them at bay.
Beware of just leaving boxes outside, we don't have the winters that the northern boys have.
Today was the first day we dipped to freezing temps last night, the north has already seen snow. You will be chasing swarms and they will still be shoveling snow.
Take the advice on location also.
 
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Check out Michael Palmer's vids. He shows a wax moth surviving below freezer temps in the winter. I can't remember which, but either the Greater wax moth or the Lesser wax moth is able to survive low temps. J
 

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Your best bet would have been to stood the box up on its end on the bottom board and put the cover over it to keep the bottom board dry. Wax moths don’t like the sunlight. I tried the freeze and store in my basement for a few years. Lost pretty much everything that had brood comb in it every time.
Basement to warm store them in cold outdoor building make sure to put them in a cooler with tight lid
 

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Not sure it gets cold enough in GA to store comb in the dark outdoors safely, North. Freezing nights keep them at bay. We usually don't see wax moths until July. And by October they are not really active. So here we can just keep our comb on hives during those months and they are fine.... Storing in the light as coal said may be the easiest. Using bt may be necessary....
 

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I just store my empty combs in the freezer and leave them there. But I'm small time. and if I run out of freezer room the solar wax melter gets used.
 
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Wax moths don’t like the sunlight.
I've been relying on that for the last 3 winters. Drawn frames for over-winter storage spent at least one night in the freezer (at around -18 deg C) and are then hung-up within the apex space of a commercial greenhouse, suspended between cropping wires with a good inch between frame top-bars, just in case one or more moths survived. So far, so good.

As you will no doubt guess, it's important to take down any new-ish combs early in Spring, else they risk sun-damage.
LJ
 

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I've been relying on that for the last 3 winters. Drawn frames for over-winter storage spent at least one night in the freezer (at around -18 deg C) and are then hung-up within the apex space of a commercial greenhouse, suspended between cropping wires with a good inch between frame top-bars, just in case one or more moths survived. So far, so good.

As you will no doubt guess, it's important to take down any new-ish combs early in Spring, else they risk sun-damage.
LJ
I have a greenhouse. That would let me defrost my freezer, lol
 

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I use the 2nd story of a building I built with board and batten siding. I just didn’t put battens on the south facing sides. Stand the supers on end next to the wall until we have a few hard freeze days
 
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