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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok everyone I need some opinions or advice please. I have a hive that has tried to requeen it self 3 times unsuccessfully so I bought a mated queen and they killed her too. There are 3 supercedure cells in the hive. Now in our area it is getting pretty late in the season for them to try to requeen themselves so should I just shake these bees out and use the foundation elsewhere or let them try again?

Thanks for any input
 

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Any brood?
Any virgins?
Any laying workers?
Any to fast of an introduction?
Any use of a lay cage?
Any honeyflow on?


All these factors as well as other affect introduction success rates!!!!
 

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>Well I have and had searched the hive over and there was no sign of a laying worker

There is never "a" laying worker. In a booming queenright colony there are 50 to 60 laying workers. In a "laying worker" hive there are thousands. Signs of a laying worker are spotty brood (like one larvae here and there) only drone caps on cells (one here and there) and in later stages, multiple eggs in the cells. Eggs are often on the sides of worker cells and in the bottoms of drone cells and on top of pollen. I'm not sure what sign you are looking for...

bushfarms.com/beeslayingworkers.htm
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
>Well I have and had searched the hive over and there was no sign of a laying worker

There is never "a" laying worker. In a booming queenright colony there are 50 to 60 laying workers. In a "laying worker" hive there are thousands. Signs of a laying worker are spotty brood (like one larvae here and there) only drone caps on cells (one here and there) and in later stages, multiple eggs in the cells. Eggs are often on the sides of worker cells and in the bottoms of drone cells and on top of pollen. I'm not sure what sign you are looking for...

bushfarms.com/beeslayingworkers.htm
Michael,

I searched for all of the above signs and none were noted. I split this hive 3 times this season as the original queen mother was superb and so have her daughters been too but since the last time the haven't been successful at requeening. My other hive that I requeened at the same time was a success. They have 3 cells almost completely ready to cap, so leave them and let them try again or shake them out in the beeyard and save my resources??
 

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If her daughters are thriving, the simple answer seems to be combine. Grow again next spring. Just my Opinion. G
 
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