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By the way to the op, this video is of a fellow who runs about 3000 hives, sells package bees, nucs, queens and a boatload of honey consistently, every year. What struck me was that he starts feeding when he first applies apivar and, for the most part, puts on his last feed when he removes the apivar. No guesswork. You might want to consider applying some of his techniques to your location and hive configurations.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dh86i9HDKck&t=803s
 

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By the way to the op, this video is of a fellow who runs about 3000 hives, sells package bees, nucs, queens and a boatload of honey consistently, every year. What struck me was that he starts feeding when he first applies apivar and, for the most part, puts on his last feed when he removes the apivar. No guesswork. You might want to consider applying some of his techniques to your location and hive configurations.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dh86i9HDKck&t=803s
The guy I get my bees from does the same thing-he has 4000 hives and sell his bottled honey to the big box stores. They don't have time to fiddle and play and guess-they do what works, year after year after year...
 

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I'm also in Northern IL, but am having the opposite problem. I'm trying to backfill some empty comb with syrup on a few hives, but they're just not taking it down fast enough. What feeding method are you using?
I don't know why, but open feeding them a light syrup mix will fill them up quickly. There's plenty of time for them to dry it up, so, no worries about the syrup being too thin.
 

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Last year I followed expert advice and fed my bees as long as they would take it (new hives). Oops! I should have been more cautious as one hive ended up honey-bound. This year I’m feeding lightly during a dearth. They need to be storing honey now, but not an over abundance!
 

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This time a year in Northern IL and WI the local bees need to be shutting down anyway.
The September bees here ARE the winter bees.
I would not worry of being honey bound - what they take, they take.
Great insight here. Winter bees are born in Aug/Sept/Oct.

Reminder that all beekeeping is local. In Northern WI the goldenrod is about done and with temps in the high 70's, low 80's and bees flying, we feed and feed until it's either too cold or they stop taking it.

We got them all ready for winter a month ago (reduced size, made sure they were all queen right etc). We extracted the honey taken throughout summer just last week, placing the now relatively empty boxes for the bees to clean up, along a bucket with thick syrup...roughly 100 yards from the bee yard. If it's warm enough for bees to fly after all the flows are done we feed. I swear it prevents robbing.

Those colonies that need to fill empty cells know exactly what to do - and those that have enough - eat less, bring home less. It really is that simple imho.

Watch your colonies and you'll see they all take and/or consume at their own pace...as needed.
 

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They will stop taking the syrup when the syrup is below 50F in temp or they don't have any place to put the honey.

I feed 2:1 pretty heavy this time of year (Southern Indiana) if I have hives below weight. I check mine the cheap and cheerful way -- if I can't lift the rear of the hive with one hand, it's good. Norther Illinois you have want more than I do here though, but the principle is the same.

Having nearly lost a good hive in the spring due to starvation, I also put a protein patty and dry sugar on the top of the hive in late November -- sugar is much cheaper than new bees, and that way I usually don't have to worry about bees running out of food in early March, when we can still get a blizzard and very cold weather for a few days.
 
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