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Open the hive and see if they have enough stored. You definitely don’t want them to become honey bound.
 

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I'm also in Northern IL, but am having the opposite problem. I'm trying to backfill some empty comb with syrup on a few hives, but they're just not taking it down fast enough. What feeding method are you using?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I use top feeders that have 2 trays inside and hold about 2 gallons.
I'm also in Northern IL, but am having the opposite problem. I'm trying to backfill some empty comb with syrup on a few hives, but they're just not taking it down fast enough. What feeding method are you using?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Goldenrod is waning and based on about 10 years of experience I see my bees looking for pollen on plant materials near my home which is removed from my bee yard. During the past, this has always been an informal indication that it is feeding time. I will however check a few hives to see if they are honey bound but I did not notice this condition when I treated them a couple of weeks ago. I limit brood box inspections as I am too darn old to move these boxes and I have learned that the less I interfere the better. The best year I have ever had in terms of honey production and survival although I did replace some queens. Wish I was up your way for pheasant hunting.

When did you start feeding, and why?
 

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Different times of the year dictate different responses. In fall I’m not concerned about hives being honey bound if my area has a weak fall flow (which it does). I’m much more concerned about getting them fed up to weight. Spring different story. Likely hood of swarming after Labor Day is remote. That’s why I feed at liberty even when they already have a full honey super on.
 

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So long as they are at winter weight, it's not necessary to continue feeding.

Northern Illinois is an extremely cold climate, so have you determined the weight of your colonies?
 

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In fall I’m not concerned about hives being honey bound if my area has a weak fall flow (which it does).
I may be misunderstanding your statement but if a hive is honey bound.....then they won't have any/enough empty cells to produce winter bees. To me....that is a cause for concern.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Although I have enjoyed beekeeping for a long time there are certain things I dont do_One of them is to weigh my hives. I have no method to do so and even if I did I can't start weighinf 15 or more hives. Can you imagine a commercial beekeeper weighing hudreds or thousands of hives? It is also impractical with 2 deeps. One deep could be heavier than the other, so it would be necessary to weigh both. I have never had a honey bound problem in that caused a faiure over winter. There comes a time when micro mangement is best suited to the curiosity of the beekeeper but of no benefit to the bees.I have also learned the degree of sugar water consumption is related to the health and size of the hive. For example, in my hives if I find a low-level ofconsumption and unused sugar water, I know I have a weak or failing hive. The antithesis of that is that I have a string thriving hive. I do an informal hive inspection when I remove the Apivar strips after 40+ days and that is the last time i interfere other than to prepare the boxes for the winter with moisture absorbing material and later Fondant. I do not wrap the hives but often use black plastic bags staples to the wood.
 

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If all you intend to do is dismiss the replies ....why in heaven's name did you even ask the question?
 

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Open the hive and see if they have enough stored. You definitely don’t want them to become honey bound.
This time a year in Northern IL and WI the local bees need to be shutting down anyway.
The September bees here ARE the winter bees.
I would not worry of being honey bound - what they take, they take.
 

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I may be misunderstanding your statement but if a hive is honey bound.....then they won't have any/enough empty cells to produce winter bees. To me....that is a cause for concern.
My colonies know what they are doing. Worrying about too much fall feeding is harmful in 6a high desert. I spoke to a commercial beek last and I'm comfortable with my decision path. I had 100% over winter last year.
 

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"There comes a time when micro management is best suited to the curiosity of the beekeeper but of no benefit to the bees." (Plannerwgp)

Probably the best guidance to newbees I've ever read! Well played!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I didn't dismiss any replies. I considered all of them but that doesn't mean I have to agree. I asked the question about when the bees would stop taking syrup. I did agree with many answers and found them helpful and then I responded. Based on your Emerson quote you are just being contradicted. Have a good day.
If all you intend to do is dismiss the replies ....why in heaven's name did you even ask the question?
 

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I did agree with many answers and found them helpful and then I responded.
You agreed with many answers? And responded? I must have missed that.
 

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I never received any response to my two (2) inquiries noted at post #2 - “When did you start feeding, and why?”
 

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I never received any response to my two (2) inquiries noted at post #2 - “When did you start feeding, and why?”
I started on September 3rd and stopped September 20. I use a rapid feeder (Ebay) on 5 hives and mason jars on resource hive. Labor Day marks a safer time to feed to avoid late swarming but while temps are high enough for them to dry it. Started with ProSweet then topped off with 2:1 sugar syrup. Went a little longer in feed timing because of wildfire smoke.
 
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