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Hi all.

One department of my employer has a thermal scanner that we use to find heat leaks in houses and tell people where to add insulation. I have a cutout to do this weekend and am unsure about the size of the colony in the wall. Would the colony exhibit enough of a heat "profile" to show up on the scanner and would this be a good way to determine how big it is before I get started?

TIA
 

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Hey Dude,
I would think so since they would be warm. Try it out and let us know how it works. Any chance of pictures concerning what the scanner sees?
 

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Depends on the temperature and the material. The IR camera is going to show you a difference in temperature so try to get as much contrast as possible (early morning or late at night). It is not going to give you a decent reading through metal that has a backing of wood. It is not going to give you a good reading on a shiny surface (high emissivity). If you see a nice hot spot go look on the other side of the wall and see if there are holes, electrical outlets, heat vents and incandescent lights.
 

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Hi all.

One department of my employer has a thermal scanner that we use to find heat leaks in houses and tell people where to add insulation. I have a cutout to do this weekend and am unsure about the size of the colony in the wall. Would the colony exhibit enough of a heat "profile" to show up on the scanner and would this be a good way to determine how big it is before I get started?

TIA
I have used a thermal imager twice to try and determine colony location. No luck either time. For it to pick up the image a couple of things have to work right. The first and most important is that the colony will need to be in contact with the wall you are scanning. If there is an air gap or insulation between them and the surface it is unlikly to pick up the difference.

Second, the ambient temp of the surface must be significantly lower than the brood next temperature. This means that an outside wall with sun shining on it may be problematic.

Third, goes back to the air gap thing. If you have sheetrock/plaster, then a second surface between you and the colony, you will not see the heat signature.

But with that said, why not try it. I don't as I have to worry to much about the $5,000 imager getting damaged or stolen.

Good Luck
 

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I've got one for work.

Like fishing for trout with marshmellows:





Don't buy one, $25 stethescope or $30 digital thermal reader that they sell at the hardware store work just as well.

Only shows you where the core of the brood nest is located, not the overall size.

Also lies to you sometimes. ....Don
 

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I use a RayTek to detect location of colony in walls. It works great most of the time. However , if it is a result of recent swarm they may be too far away from the material surface to cast a warm 'glow'

The RayTek is a infrared thermometer commonly used by auto mechanic and cost less than $50.
 

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I'm itching to try it. I have a $2000 FLIR i7 that is exquisitely sensitive, and can show temperature differentials well less than one degree.

I'll agree with the posters who say the conditions must be right. You would not want sun heating the wall, and cooler ambient temperatures would be better. An 85 degree colony on a 95 degree day probably won't give much. Night might work better in hot weather.

Don't be mislead by reflections. If there is a shiny surface, you might see a reflection of your own body heat.

I've also got a snake inspection camera I'd like to try.

Hey, wow, you guys mean I might finally use the Harbor Freight stethoscope I've had for decades and used twice?
 

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The FLIR is also useful to monitor hives in winter. It shows contrast in just a degree or two. :)
IR_0357.jpg
The picture above is in my shop, where these bees spent the winter....The top is open for this pic.
IR_0361.jpg
 

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