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This is out dated, But punctuation CAN make a difference. I already wrote so I’m posting it! LOL!!

Don’t discuss “16 drones.” It confuses the discussion since there are 16 chromosomes. Use a different number or “n.”

Drones contain a randomly selected basket of their mother’s genes due to meiosis. Bits of her maternal and paternal genetic material. So as stated above, lots of possible variants.

Another point of confusion is a typo in post #73. There should have been an apostrophe in “drones” to indicate 1 drone, not multiple drones. (ie. drone’s). 16 chromosomes from one drone.

I hope this is clear as mud now.


See quote below.


“But a fertilized egg gets ALL of the the drones (16 out of 16) DNA (or 1/2 of the drones mothers dna if you will ) . So on the drone side there are only as many different combinations as there were drones that mated with the queen.”
 

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Discussion Starter #102
Lauri's method of re queening production hives with 48s
https://www.beesource.com/forums/sh...ening-above-an-excluder&p=1447471#post1447471

Interesting that she feels it often delays the offing of the old queen till the new one is laying.

could be an interesting way to change out a packages genetics to resistant stock once local 48s come available, the package queen has a high chance of being superseded anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #103
Larry Connor talking about 48s this may at a NY bee wellness webinar this may. including a snipit about john Kefuss overnighting 48s to pairs at 5 euros a pop
https://youtu.be/SdJN0Hd4nuE?t=1607

and he gives us the answer to this
How much food do the bees actually put in the cell after 48 hours?
the cells have 80%+ of the all the jelly they will get

My knee jerk is he is wrong, but he is the expert, not me
 

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Good talk. MSL. Thank you for posting. Beyond his discussion on 48 hour cells, there were two other things he briefly referred to that surprised me:

1. He seemed to at least not dismiss the idea of different eggs being laid in queen cups versus worker cells- I assume he is referring to some of the research on 'royal families'.

2. He said that swarm cells are better than grafted cells- but also clarified that good grafted cells make good queens too.
 

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Discussion Starter #107

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a 72 hour cell has about 66% more jelly then a 48 (and thats not counting what the larva ate over those 24 hours)
MSL:

Thank you for posting this paper- I finally got around to reading this one.

So it seems plain that 72 hour cells have more RJ in them so it made me wonder- why 48 hour cells? I went back and read Dr. Connor's paper where he quotes Kefuss saying to effect, 'large enough to be away from the colony, but small enough to not crawl out of the cell'. I suppose if one is dealing with short distance transfers and thought the additional jelly might be of benefit they could stretch this out another 12 hours or so and still leave time for the new colony to cap?
 

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Yes, one shipment. I ship them regularly and with great success. No nurse bees needed. Just a damp paper towel, a sheet of plastic on top, so it doesn't dry out too quickly. Done. Overnight parcel service, works great.
 
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