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6a 4th yr 9 colonies inc. 2 resource hives
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The sticky board has become an essential tool in my apiary. Not only does it give me a trend alert to varroa, but I can also see what my bees are bringing in or throwing out. In August I look at them daily and clean every 3 days. When it alerted me to a varroa spike in one hive I cleaned, confirmed and immediately treated when the threshold of 10 a day was crossed. I don't mind doing a small task each day to avoid something big.

What do you see on your sticky boards and what can we learn. Are our bees bringing in pollen successfully? What about wax? Do those clear ovals mean they are producing wax well? What about the size of the colony? Do we need to feed? There's so much more to see if we know what we're looking at. :)
 

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True enough. You and and enjambres should write a book on how to read a sticky board. I find some weird looking things for sure. but primarily I just slide it out and give it a quick glance and can tell if everything is normal. J
 

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It's good to look at sticky boards, and clean after every inspection. We found a hive that had somehow lost its queen and stopped rearing brood due to the clues on the sticky board - no debris from capped brood emerging, so no brood, so time to combine. ;)
 

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They definitely help in not having to open the hive to see what is going on all the time too!
I m still puzzled by what I see on my sticky board at the moment.....for the second year, they stayed on the same frames over winter, rather than move onto to new stores.
Okay, it has been two years of rather warm winter days, but, it seems like they have moved the feed to the cluster rather than just move along to the next comb.

I also have a window on the rear wall so I can see into the hive. I think that this is also an excellent thing for newbies like me to have.
 

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I love it - gives you a rough idea of mite levels between sugar/alcohol rolls, lets you see which frames have hatching brood, and lets you see what kinds (well, colours) of pollen are coming in. I clean mine off on every visit - it provides a nice visual of what is going on in the hive.

Best time is after a mite treatment, seeing all those little bodies scattered over the board brings a twinkle to my eye and a smile to my face
 

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if I leave mine in more than two days or so, I seem to scrape off a lot of accumulation as I slide the board out. There is only a tolerance of about 1/4" once board is on the rails it rests on.
 
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