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Discussion Starter #1
Would you say the slowest part of starting bee keeping is building up drawn foundations? Once a foundation is drawn then it stays drawn, right? I mean, they do get drawn, filled with honey, capped, removed, have the cap cut off, honey extracted, and then you are left with a drawn foundation, right?

If this is correct, could you then use at least one deep super above your two hive bodies for the bees to store surplus honey in to be extracted so you would be left with a deep of drawn foundation to make splits the following year, or even hive a swarm, or is there a complication with this?

Thanks, John
 

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You are correct as far as drawn comb goes. It is gold, expecially when you are just starting. Keep in mind supered honey combs are larger, so using them in brood nest is not a good idea.
 

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A box is a box no matter what size it is. Just because it is on top doesn't mean it is only for honey.

Using deep boxes as supers to get them drawn then extracting and using the combs for more hives later is common practice.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks guys! I think I'll go ahead and super with a few deeps just to have the extra drawn deep foundation available. But not all deeps because I'll also want some medium drawn foundation for future supers.

Thanks, John
 

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When I first started, I used to super with deeps because I wanted drawn comb for increasing my hive count more quickly after extracting once.

Keep in mind a full deep super of honey weighs about 90 pounds . . .

I had read about a 91 year-old beekeeper who used all deeps all his life and was still using them at his age. So, I figured why not--I'm a lot younger than that?!!

After I knocked over a boiling over hive on a 92 degree July day, taking off (struggling) with full deep honey supers, from a 4-high deep hive--I gave up on deep supers. I thought I was going to have a heart attack that day.
 

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I'm going to echo Beeslave: Huh? :scratch: We're using about 50% deeps for supering so that we do have drawn comb for splits, etc. We must have abnormal bees 'cuz ours use them, no problem, in the brood chambers. :eek:
 

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:scratch:What's that have to do with the price of tea in China?

We're talking about new comb being drawn and used as honey storage then being used later for brood frames.:p
 

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You can use them, I guess. I am on small cell and do not treat. How about you? What is in your honey?
are ya lookin to start an argument today?? this has nothing to do with the question that was asked. To answer the question that was asked: yes you can store the drawn comb and use it in the brood chambers, or in honey supers. We use drawn comb for both, we super with deeps going into orange blossom and then extract, those combs are then used through the summer in the brood chambers for splits/increases or it is put back into honey supers for additional flow/blooms. Properly stored it can last for a long time.
 

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Ok. You want to use brood frames to harvest honey that is fine. I do not do it because it darkens/taints the honey, but do as you like. Also, my supered honey frames are very wide (spaced to 9 frame) for ease of extraction, so I dont really want them in my brood chambers because they cannot fit/do not work correctly. Using frames like that for my brood chamber is not really an option for me. I left some in once by accident: The hive swarmed, because the queen would not lay in them. I do not treat -- and small/natural cell beekeeping, though not a magic bullet, helps with my IPM. I keep my brood (darker comb) and my supering frames separate, both for the above reasons and because I can rotate my wax out more quickly and easily for the bottom frames and leave the supered (untrampled) sections intact upstairs for a longer period, which is where it counts for me during a honey flow. You can swap frames all you want in your operation, and I am happy that works for you -- it does not in mine. My customers do not want chemicals in their honey and my management practices are different from yours in order to provide that product.
 

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Mythomane; where did you get the idea that everyone who uses super frames in the brood chambers is using chemicals. You're adding 2+2 and getting 9! Take a break man!
 

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Reading this thread is like arguing with my wife.

"We put foundation in our honey supers to get it drawn out for our brood chambers next year."

"Your honey will have chemicals in it and mine won't."

Huh??:scratch:
 

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Once you get extra combs drawn out and in storage, you will need to worry about wax moths eating the combs if brood has been raised in them. (and mice damage)

Drawn combs don't always stay drawn out nice forever.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I may be mistaken about what I have read, but I thought I read that you can freeze drawn foundation and then use it when you need it? Is this correct or has anyone tried it with success? I'm not talking about for Varroa control and drone brood, just freezing drawn foundation to keep it safe until needed. I do have a BIG deep freeze.

Thanks, John
 

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There is no such thing as drawn foundation. Foundation is undrawn. Once comb is drawn, it is drawn comb.

Yes, you can store it in a freezer, but storage space is an issue. One deep is over 1.75 cu feet of space. I don't know that it would be cost efficient when you look at electricity and freezer costs when you are only able to freeze the boxes for a couple hives.
 

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I gave reasons why I do not use them. I am not your wife. The guy asked for advice and I gave him mine. Keep it in the deep freeze if you have the room. Wax moths can cause a great deal of damage. You want to swap out your brood frames with your supers, that is fine. I do not do it for the reasons illustrated above. I keep the cell size down in my brood and up for my supers. There are many ways to keep bees. I have been keeping them untreated for 15+ years.. Before 1990 if you wanted to slapdash your operation you could get away with it. Things are different now, at least for me. You want to ignore simple management techniques and take up the slack with chemicals, go for it. You want to pass on advice in that vein, great. You do not see any connection between management, chemicals, disease and final product, then ok.
 

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Mythomane-You still don't get it! Foundation(deep) used for honey super to get drawn and extracted then used for brood later. Not brood comb used later for honey storage.
 
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