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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi
I see on beekeeping youtube guides, that when removing upper super to check the above one, always tilt and put it on the side of the super and not just straight on the ground. what is the explanation ? what is the risk of putting the super as it stays on the hive?

Thanks,
Randi
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
But they have enough space between the bottom of the frame and the end of the super, dosn't they?
 

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I always check through the top box/supper if needed before removing it. When I do remove it, I never lay it on the side, if you do the combs can clack together :eek: I always lay them either on the front or back faces, the combs won't clack together that way. I used to set them on rails, next to the hive as they set on rails. I stopped doing it that way when a queen got crushed on a rail, in October :doh: . I always set them on the ground on front or back face because of that.
 

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Beeks get in the habit of putting supers on the side to keep dirt and debris out of the brace comb. I put mine flat on the overturned cover. No dirt, no debris, no leaky mess, well the bees can clean it off the cover.
 

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If you set it flat on the grass you end up with a lot of bees left in the grass when you pick it up. If you stand it on end, you don't. I usually set an empty box on the grass and stack them on that, but a lid will work. I just don't like to bend over that far...
 

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I didn't come up with this idea, but it's what I do. I bring an empty deep with me to the bee yard. The telescoping cover gets turned over and set on the ground, the empty box goes in/on the cover and the upper hive body full of bees gets set on this. Top it off with the inner cover (cover the hole with the brick if desired) while going through the lower box. The height from the extra box makes it nice when it's time to pick it up again.
 

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But they have enough space between the bottom of the frame and the end of the super, dosn't they?
Depends on the construction of the box. Some boxes have bee space at the top, others at the bottom, and others still split the bee space and put 3/16ths inch on top and 3/16ths inch on the bottom so that when they are stacked they have proper bee space.
 

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I buy cheap ($10 a pair) plastic saw horses that I leave in the bee yard all year long. With a couple 2x4s across them they are just the right size to hold 2 supers. You could tack on an additional 1x1 strip to minimize the chance of crushing bees. Best part is there is no bending over
 

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now THATS a great idea! if my back gets any worse i will be trying this out. this is what i think BEESOURCE is about- beekeepers helping beekeepers. good on you, sweetacres!
 

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I use old brood boxes that are not worth fixing any more.I will put the lid (bottom side up) on top of the old brood box. This way if any honey leaks out of the super on to the lid, it will be inside the hive when i put it back together. Helps prevent robbing. Jack
 

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Stand it on its' end or stack them on an upside down cover to keep them off the ground and out of the grass and so honey doesn't drip into the grass or onto the ground causing robbing.
 

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I use this little work bench, its Aluminum, light and folds up.
I set the supper or deep crosswise; if the box was cut short I will place a lid upside down under it. I have a place to set if need
It’s rated for over 200 Lbs.
It folds up in about two seconds and I’m headed home.
At Home some uses are attaching lights for the Mrs. (CAUTION, I noticed that she’s taken a liking to it, you might need two of them )and Painting
I could go on and on……
I dont know if the link will work, If not go to Home depot web sight.

http://www.homedepot.com/Building-M...splay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053
 

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I've always done it like MB said in his answer, I put an old super, one no longer usable for bees, on the ground next to the hive being manipulated, then stack the supers being moved onto the empty one, usually crosswise so many fewer bees are at risk of being squashed. Sometimes I use an upturned cover. It depends on what is available, but I have more worn-out supers than extra covers.
 

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We keep an empty brood box or super in the yards for setting brood boxes on (like checking the bees). Supers usually are not removed unless they are ready to be harvested. Supers are pulled and either placed on the truck or on a hive thats already been pulled when working in two or three man teams. That way you are not bending over constantly.
 
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