Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'd like to share our most recent publication:

The Potential Management of a Ground-Nesting, Solitary Bee: Anthophora abrupta (Hymenoptera: Apidae)

Here is the link to the pdf:
http://www.bioone.org/doi/pdf/10.1653/024.098.0220


Abstract:
In Apr 2010, Anthophora abrupta (Say) (Hymenoptera: Apidae) was discovered nesting in open bags of colloidal clay in Gainesville, Florida, USA, in an open-air shed. Label data from A. abrupta specimens in the Hymenoptera holdings of the Florida State Collection of Arthropods indicated that no specimen had been collected previously from Alachua County and that the most recent Floridian specimen was collected in 1987. This suggests that A. abrupta may be locally rare and possibly in decline or threatened regionally. Many of the plants that A. abrupta is reported to visit are listed as threatened or endangered in 1 or more states. In an effort to study the potential management and conservation of this species, the original nest aggregation was split in 2012 and 2013, and the splits were moved to new nest sites to see if they would establish at the new sites. Both mother and daughter nest aggregations were monitored in Spring of 2012–2014. Herein, a brief review of A. abrupta natural history, an account of the attempts to split the aggregations for new nest establishment, and suggestions for the potential management of this beneficial insect are discussed.

I hope you enjoy reading the paper as much as I enjoyed working on this project.
I also appreciate any feedback you may want to give at [email protected].
Jason
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,072 Posts
Interesting, I would like to know more about bumble bees and carpenter bees. This year I have seen more large solid black bumble bees working my Texas Ranger shrub. Up to three at a time which I have not seen in the past. Maybe the drought is pushing them my way?

Thank you for sharing.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top