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Discussion Starter #1
I live in hazard ky I installed my 3 pound package of cordovan bees may the first Ive checked them 4 times the three outer frames on each side are not quite drawn out but the 4 innermost frames are almost completely filled
honey at the top pollen and brood . today i veiwed some new bees hatching out of their cells. I have been feeding them sugar water since the first and
want to know how long to continue feeding them and also how long i should expect for the rest of the frames to be filled I have a ten frame hive one brood box only with a screened bottom board and telescoping cover
im a beginner and could use all the help availabe
 

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You are checking and disturbing them way too much. Every two weeks is enough to remedy anything you are likely to run into. You should probably stop feeding because there is plenty blooming now. Relax and enjoy your hive. If you keep up this feverish pace they will likely abscond or leave you frustrated. Be content just watching them fly in and out! Wait for sundown or just before a rain storm if you want to see some real activity.
 

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While i agree that you are in them too much, and Americas is right, rotate thos frames around and checkeboard them, and they will start to draw the other frames. My first year i swear I was in my hives WAY too much, but everyone learns differntly. Everyones approach is a lot different, which is why this place is so awesome. I have been watching mine every few days because they are liking to honeybound themselves this year, offing the queen, and creating queen cells. They have had plenty of room, but didn't want to mive up at first. They are doing well now.
 

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Hi Joe,
I'm somewhat north of you in Central Indiana. In your first year, your main concern is getting the bees through their first winter. Here, we would advise you to continue to feed the bees, since it appears they are drawing out comb from bare foundation, until they had filled two deeps. Having drawn comb is a huge advantage and anything they draw out this year will be an asset next. Since you probably had no intention of taking any honey for yourself this year, I would continue to feed and have them draw comb. It will pay off next Spring. If you already have drawn comb, enough for two deeps, then you can stop feeding until you see what they look like in August. In August, if they are light on stores, you might want to start feeding again. But you'll want to go into next winter with two full deeps.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys for the info without this site I wouldnt know what to do it is a big help having someone give me info on these matters
 

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I agree with everything JOHNYOGA2 had just said! Keep feeding...Your goal on a new package is to get 2 deep hive bodies full of drawn comb! Good Luck!
 

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Hi Joe,
They seem to work the middle frames fastest. Rotating the middle frames to the outside as they fill out will help some, but a strong colony with constant feed will probably fill out the second deep in 2-6 weeks. (Sometimes the girls are wax making champs, sometimes not so much...). A rough guideline would be from package install to two full (drawn out) deeps in 10 weeks with constant feed. Not written in stone. That should put you somewhere in mid to late July. Around here there is not much flow then. You could then put on a super and either see if they'll make a crop or put on a super and continue to feed and let them build more comb. You could use any "honey" (honey made from sugar water is not really considered "honey") they stored to feed other hives but the built up comb will be a big advantage come the Spring flow next year. I'm happy if a new hive will draw out two deeps and most of a medium super in their first year. I usually let them winter with it all.
 
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