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I have been wanting to make some late splits and I had 4 early splits in double deeps that were excessively bearding so I wanted to move them into a deep hive body. Today was one of my last good opportunities for a couple of weeks to work them. I WILL NEVER MAKE SPLITS AGAIN NOR WORK BEES IN WEATHER LIKE THIS. I think I almost died and probably about gave my son a heat stroke. The temperature was a very tolerable 88 degrees when we started but the humidity was running around 55%. Right after we started a T'storm popped up and moved just to our south and east. We got no cool air from the storm but the humidity popped up to 85%. I hear "the 150 rule" often during the summer. That's when the temperature plus humidity % added together equals 150 or more. 150 is rough but 173 is real bad.

To top it off I only found a suitable amount of capped brood to feel comfortable making one split. I could have made more but with the sweat pouring into my eyes I didn't find a single queen. So I took one frame of eggs from one hive, one frame of pollen and honey from another hive and a frame of dark capped brood from a third hive and stuck them all in one nuc and will let them ride. I put the bees on each frame in the nuc and smoked them very good to hopefully keep them from fighting.
 

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Can't imagine 88 being tolerable to do anything but sit in the shade and drink a cool one:)
 

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Janne, you live waaaaay up north. Those of us down here can tolerate 88 degrees.

That said, I spent quite a few hours this weekend in my bee jacket with the temps being in the low 90s, only thing I really didnt like was the sweat that got in my eyes. That said I was glad to be back inside in the AC.
 

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If we follow this rule here in Florida we would be able to work with bees only in the winter :) I would suggest investing into a good ventilated bee suit. I myself use just a mesh bug jacket and pants with t-shirt and shorts under ($30 on Amazon for the both). I know it is not a proper bee suite but it provides adequate protection and keeps you cooler than any other bee suit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Can't imagine 88 being tolerable to do anything but in the shade and drink a cool one:)
You would likely melt into a puddle down here in July and August and I would likely freeze solid in January and February up there. It's all relative....
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If we follow this rule here in Florida we would be able to work with bees only in the winter :) I would suggest investing into a good ventilated bee suit. I myself use just a mesh bug jacket and pants with t-shirt and shorts under ($30 on Amazon for the both). I know it is not a proper bee suite but it provides adequate protection and keeps you cooler than any other bee suit.
I had on a ventilated bee jacket. Since I was swapping bees from one hive to another I wore gloves. I hate gloves and rarely wear them. I had to pull my sons gloves off his hands and he had to do the same for me. I was able to wring sweat out of the gloves when I got them off. They were saturated. I've spent a good bit of time in FL and it is hot. Miserably hot, but you normally have a breeze blowing due to the Gulf or Atlantic. Today would have been okay if we had any breeze at all. It was dead still. No evaporation.
 

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I could have made more but with the sweat pouring into my eyes I didn't find a single queen.
And you guys wonder why I split by the box? Bada bing, bada bang your done. It either works or it doesn't. Same as yours.
 

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I've been at the point of being dizzy and seeing spots many times. Not a good idea. I have the problem less since getting ventilated jackets and suits... but still a hot summer day is difficult. At home you can just close up and go back to the house for a cold drink. It's worse in an outyard because there is always one more little thing you want to get done so you can go home...

I like to have some frozen bottles of water to take to an outyard and one that is not frozen. Then I can drink the melted water from one of the bottles and replace with some of the unfrozen bottle... and have cold water all afternoon...
 

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Mann Lake sells a little blue "spongy" headband. I wet one or two for around neck, one for around head -- it cools slightly and helps keep sweat off my glasses. At break, rewet and switch around. I understand the old advice about afternoon shade.
 

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Yeap...gets dern hot down here huh??!! The humidity is what is so bad!!! My jeans were soaked Saturday as I'm working with mine too. I was taking breaks tween the hives but in your instance i can understand since you had you your split open and adding to it from the 3 hives,,,,couldnt really stop. I did my split the same way...assets from 3 diffrent hives and they got along well as in I didnt see any fighting. Saw orienting flights the next day.
i dont like wearing gloves but i dont like getting stung either. After 3 or 4 stings I'm putting them on and that leather just clings huh??
 

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Please don't take offense to this but reading all there's comments had me laughing my ***** off.
That said I'm am looking forward to my yearly visit to Alabama this summer, heat and all. :)
 

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Had on my ultrabreeze on Saturday. Spent 3 hours, from 0830 til 1130, going thru 4 of my hives. Had on nitrile gloves. When I took them off, at least an ounce of sweat poured out of each one. My fingers looked like I had spent... well, 3 hours in a tub of water. When I hit the AC inside the house, I nearly fainted. Was nauseous, prolly on the brink of heat exhaustion. Hit the shower ASAP, and drank a coupla glasses of water in pretty short order. Had to hang my t-shirt, pants, and socks out to dry for a few hours since they were solidly soaked with sweat.

NOT a fun part of bee-keeping, to be sure. Would have loved to take my gloves off, but one hive in particular, even after being smoked several times, were hitting my gloved hands every time they moved towards a frame.
 

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I stripped down to a pair of track shorts before I put on my Ultrabreeze. Still sweated a few gallons. I hear you on the gloves. My last pair of leather finally disintegrated and I'm using chem gloves from HD. Hate the sweat inside.
 

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I imagine if a fella had a five gallon bucket of water...

...he could soak his head for some relief?

Maybe?? Sort of like a Swiss Army Bucket.
 

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I only have the jacket, so use my BDU-stype pants as lowers. I'm starting to think I could use my BDU top and a veil and be cooler than this "breezy" suit is!!

I also keep a dry (at the beginning) towel in the veil part to wipe sweat, or at least let it drip down onto. I sweat A LOT when it gets muggy...

I stripped down to a pair of track shorts before I put on my Ultrabreeze. Still sweated a few gallons. I hear you on the gloves. My last pair of leather finally disintegrated and I'm using chem gloves from HD. Hate the sweat inside.
 

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90 with 100% humidity here next to the Mississippi River.

The bee jacket is awful. I'm soaked to the bone in 30 minutes. Can't afford a ultra breeze. But...

I've tried to be braver this season. No gloves. Sometimes I'll wear my veil. I had to summon a heck of a lot of courage! Smoke the hands. Keep the fingers together. Don't drop the frame when a bee lands on my hands. Don't scream like a little girl when a bee buzzes the face. Takes some time to get used to. ... :)
 
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