Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Need some options of storing comb after extraction. Last year I used froze then used Bt dried and stored in plastic containers ...they molded enough where I didn't want to put them back in the hive ...I know it's said that the bees will take care of the mold but..... are moth crystals in plastic bags a good option?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
319 Posts
I use the moth crystals but I don't put the supers in plastic bags. I just stack the supers on a peice of plywood as high as I can reach and put the crystals in the top box and put an outer cover on top. I put them in an out building that has plenty ventilation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
I think moth crystals are the most realistic option. If you start now you'll need to keep an eye on the stack of supers as the moth crystals will evaporate in time. The tighter the stack the longer it will last. I'd start out checking it every 2-3 weeks until you get a feel for how often it needs replenishing.

I used to leave mine on the colony until fall/winter but with the arrival of SHB I don't think that's the best plan unless the colony is quite strong and your sure that SHB are not an issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,183 Posts
Last year i put them all back on hives overnight to be cleaned up, sprayed them with bt, then stacked the supers criss crossed to make sure they were bone dry. No problems at all. A few combs had a very tiny bit of wax moth damage, but nothing that would be an issue at all. Any combs that had a lot of pollen after extracting got frozen before storage to prevent shb from hatching out in it.

A strong hive or swarm that needs the space will clean up moldy comb so fast and good... You certainly should not throw it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Think I will try both methods this year ...under a shelter that has no sides?
I have the Bt but can one buy the proper crystals locally without having to order?
How many crystals do you put on top? on paper?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,166 Posts
Be sure and use the crystals approved for bee hives. Don't use moth balls-will kill your bees. Air the comb out for a week or two before putting back on hive. I haven't had much trouble with moths on foundation or dry comb that was used for honey only. I have read that the pollen,cocoons, and other residue from brood raising are what the moth larva eat while destroying your comb. I had two hives that crashed last year and the moths destroyed the brood comb but were slower to get into the supers and I managed to save most of the honey and comb by freezing then giving to other hives. If I had checked the hives as soon as I noticed decreased activity, I might have saved the hives. They were in more shade than my other hives s o shade may have had something to do with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,579 Posts
Last year i put them all back on hives overnight to be cleaned up, sprayed them with bt, then stacked the supers criss crossed to make sure they were bone dry. No problems at all. A few combs had a very tiny bit of wax moth damage, but nothing that would be an issue at all. Any combs that had a lot of pollen after extracting got frozen before storage to prevent shb from hatching out in it.

A strong hive or swarm that needs the space will clean up moldy comb so fast and good... You certainly should not throw it out.
I do what David did except without the bt . minor damage that didn't matter
 

·
Vendor
Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
Joined
·
54,171 Posts
>are moth crystals in plastic bags a good option?

Assuming you use PDB and not Napthalene, then it is approved. It is also, however, both a carcinogen and lipophilic (loves wax) and it will build up in the wax in the hive. It is poisonous to bees and will not all "air out" of the hive. If you use Napthalene, you can multiply all those problems by 10...

http://bushfarms.com/beeswaxmoths.htm
http://www.bushfarms.com/beespests.htm#waxmoths
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
" Slightly better, and on the FDA list as approved, is PDB (Para Dichlorobenzene). But both of these are carcinogens and I have no use for such things in my food supply, and beehives are part of my food supply.''
MB ...if approved for use where do you get the information that they are carcinogens? Has the FDA screwed up on this one?
 

·
Vendor
Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
Joined
·
54,171 Posts
Try a search on paradichlorobenzene msds and you can find any number of the MSDS sheets on it. Here is one:

http://www.sciencelab.com/msds.php?msdsId=9923722

Quote (emphasis mine):
"Potential Acute Health Effects:
Very hazardous in case of skin contact (irritant, permeator), of eye contact (irritant), of ingestion, of inhalation. Inflammation of the eye is characterized by redness, watering, and itching. Skin inflammation is characterized by itching, scaling, reddening, or, occasionally, blistering.

"Potential Chronic Health Effects:
Very hazardous in case of skin contact (irritant, permeator), of eye contact (irritant), of ingestion, of inhalation. CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS: Classified A3 (Proven for animal.) by ACGIH. Classified 2 (Reasonably anticipated.) by NTP.
MUTAGENIC EFFECTS: Not available. TERATOGENIC EFFECTS: Not available. DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY: Not available. The substance is toxic to kidneys, lungs, liver, mucous membranes. Repeated or prolonged exposure to the substance can produce target organs damage. Repeated or prolonged inhalation of dust may lead to chronic respiratory irritation."

And then in high does there is dementia:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21565601
http://npic.orst.edu/factsheets/PDBtech.html
http://www.sigmaaldrich.com/catalog/papers/21565601

Which makes one wonder how much affect it has on your brain in small does, which no one notices...

And if you care to read about it, affects on your sex hormones, damage to kidneys and liver etc. etc. etc...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Category 3 carcinogens are defined as substances which cause concern owing to possible carcinogenic effects but the available information is not adequate. There is some evidence from animal studies but this is insufficient to place the substance in category 2 - See more at: http://www.hsa.ie/eng/Your_Industry...cinogens_Classification/#sthash.PA6kG8gx.dpuf

MB ...I assume this is the reason that FDA approves this substance?
 

·
Vendor
Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
Joined
·
54,171 Posts
>...does...does...

My spell checker keeps changing words as I type them... this should be dose... both times...

>MB ...I assume this is the reason that FDA approves this substance?

You'd have to ask the FDA... but it is definitely a carcinogen in small mammals... no reason to believe it would be different in large mammals. I could care less about mold--the bees will clean that up... but I do care about carcinogens in my food...
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top