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Discussion Starter #1
So the stars aligned and I am in double jeopardy. The power went out at my wintering shed, and the temperature outside jumped. So now I am having a really hard time trying to cool them back off. Fans running 24/7 and all I can get is a couple of degrees of cooling even with the temperature outside being 10 degrees cooler. I couldn't kick the doors open last night because the moonlight was too bright and the bees were flying towards it. Attached are the images the hives bearding and I only got to 60F in the building. Once it gets past 50F it is very difficult to reverse. It is only 39F outside and I cannot get the temperature down in the building. It's cloudy tonight and so I have kicked the doors open and I have filled two barrels with snow and put them in the building to act as a 'swamp cooler'. Fingers crossed.


Temperature_Overshoot.jpg Temperature_Overshoot_2.JPG
 

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Ain't farming fun? I would come up with a generator myself. It can be a noisy cheap one. You will sleep better with the noise than worrying all night.
 

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Mine will beard too when it gets warm.
Have you been able to cool the shed at night now? A larger air exchange might be in order. What size of fan in the building right now ?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Mine will beard too when it gets warm.
Have you been able to cool the shed at night now? A larger air exchange might be in order. What size of fan in the building right now ?
Ian,
I only have a 12X24 shed w/8ft ceiling. I have a 100cfm bath fan, and ~500cfm inlet fan and discharge fans (push and pull). I guessed a little because I am not good with heat load calculations and I am really not sure what kind of a load each hive is. I have read it is 20w per hive. Did you do your own calculations or was it just trial and error?

P.S. Thanks for the complement on the hives. (Those are the best ones BTW, some are much weaker.)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Vance,
I got the generator on in about 3 hours, being an electrician I fix my stuff last and don't have an automatic transfer. That was the result of 3 hours while I was at the Blue Rodeo concert last night. It is really tough to control once they get past 50F.
 

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During warm periods it's nice to have a large fan to switch out the air. I also have ceiling fans which mix the air. During warming periods I turn them in high to create a windy environment. That helps keep them in the hives.
 

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I would blow as much of that 39 deg air in as possible. those small exhaust and intake fans
arn't pushing much air in your building.......get something big to blow that 39 deg air in...
the snow things will have to go through a heat exchange and that takes time,,,instant
39 deg air is whats needed....Barn fan, box fan, something to get that cooler air in...
just my humble opinion...

==McBee7==
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Update: This information is more for those contemplating wintering hives inside. Just to help understand how tricky it really is as an amateur to keep bees cool.

Personally I just find it fascinating.

12X24X8 building with 98 hives in it.

My bees got too hot and I am trying to cool them.

It's 10:00pm I've managed to lower the temperature 4 degrees in 5 hours.

With an ambient outside of 39F (4C) and starting with 55F (13C) in the building:
I have a ceiling fan on high.
I have a 110cfm bath fan on.
A 500cfm blower pushing air into the building.
A 500cfm blower pulling air from the building.
A 4 inch vent (for makeup air on the bath fan.)
An oscillating fan.
Two barrels full of snow. (Swamp Cooler)
AND a 3x6 door wide open.

The bees are still keeping the building almost 5 degrees above the outside temp!!

I have just kicked open the second 3X6 door in an attempt to get it down to ambient.
 

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If as you said-bees generate 20watts of heat per hive--times 98 hives, thats almost
2000 watts of heat---I dare say if its 39 deg. outside and you turn on a 2k watt heater
in a 2300 (8 by 12 by 24) cubic ft. buildingl---The temp is going up...
someone had posted a Canadian research PDF a few weeks ago and it said--

"When wintering without air-conditioning, a maximum of one hive per 30-35 cu. ft. Is suggested. If wintering with adequate airconditioning this can be increased to I hive per 15 cu. ft."

you have 2300cubic feet divided by 98 you get about==23.5==cubic feet per hive...
Your a little on the high side, on the hive concentration side, without air conditioning..

I do think your doing a great job and I hope to make a similar instalation myself next
year.....:}

==McBee7==
 
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