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Right now,one hive consisting of two 10 frame deeps of an Ohio swarm of muttsutts.
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Discussion Starter · #21 · (Edited)
2" of foam under the top cover?
Actually, I have a piece of 1-1/2" insulation foam on the very top of the outer cover on the outside of it and strapped down with a brick and rachet strap. A beekeeper of 40 years in my area says that is what he does so I am trying it. I do not have insulation on the underside of the top cover, however, the top cover rests on a quilt box with a moister board. With the daytime temperatures that we have had this past month, I fear I may have jumped the gun to early on the Bee Cozy wrap.
 

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Right now,one hive consisting of two 10 frame deeps of an Ohio swarm of muttsutts.
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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
I do not know your location, but if you are North of me your hives could be broodless and if so a treatment would drop many mites as they are all vulnerable to treatment at this stage. This makes mite sampling a guessing game, when you have lots of brood you may only get 3 mites but when you have no brood you could get 30 mites in the sample which gives you a fright but is of the same value as the first sample with brood. So now is the time to get your mites as low as pssible so that they no longer can feed on your winter bees and you can start off in the spring with few mites.
Yep,I am a bit north of you up in northeast, Ohio, not far from Youngstown.
 

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Right now,one hive consisting of two 10 frame deeps of an Ohio swarm of muttsutts.
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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Johno, UN is in the northeast...!
Most of our colonies have a small patch of brood or less. I know this because I sample some in the yard that look average to make sure honey stores are on track (if no more brood being reared then the honey is static until mid Jan here. If more brood being raised they may still starve out...). I was in a yard 4 days ago and one colony had drones coming and going. So I thought there are issues as most colonies kicked out the drones 2 months ago. So I checked brood chamber. There is the 2021 Sam Comfort queen laying up a (comparatively) sizeable brood nest. No issues found. Will check again later to see if they need more honey.... Lows have been in 20sF, Thursday got up to 60F but mostly highs are in 40s with a few days not getting out of 30s. I would assume to be brood less at this point but there can be outliers....
With that much brood I can't really see calling them clustered, no insulation yet. So a brood less treatment of OA would not have the desired effect bow. I would say go ahead and use the OA but don't expect a single treatment to get all mites. Easy enough to do a few more treatments after until your drop drops....
I was thinking one treatment would have been enough but after thought and looking further into the weather forecast, I see a few days in and around 45 degrees F so I am going to try and get in a few more treatments about a week apart. I'd like to hit them one more time in December providing we get a warm day but the forecast for December dosen't look good. I am in Northeast, Ohio.
 

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I will do a treatment in late November look for a good day in mid December treat again and if I get a chance in January will do another treament. I have been doing this for a number of years and my state inspections in Mid April have come up with zero mites in their alcohol washes.
 

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Fwiw I was treatment free for 8 years and the state inspections came up with zero mites in April. I know better than to believe them.... johno, What are you temps in those months and what is a good day? Tx
 

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Amibusiness, any day that is aroung 45 degrees is good enough for me. Even in December we can get days over 50 degrees, generally it is warmer in front of an approaching cold front, January is the problem but I have found days over 45 degrees so far. Remember I an retired so can wait for that day to come around. As far as those mite counts are concerned sure there must be some mites in the brood but they must be thin on the ground. The inspecter does find mites in his washes on other inspections in Virginia. I would even treat at 40 degrees in January if time was running out.
 

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You guys got me worried now with your talk of still brooding! :rolleyes: Three weeks ago I felt I was over and done with treating for the year but I think I will cut a hole in the rear of my insulation and do another OAV. To heck with the expense!:)

Done! smoked thru front entrance.
 

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Sam Ramsey has discovered that Varroa mites are evolving a smaller species of Varroa and they are able to tuck under the abdominal plates of the bees better avoiding any contact treatments. He also discovered that the mites can hold their breath for up to 2 hours avoiding the higher concentrations as well. Us beekeepers need to start evolving faster then the mites!

Nothing scientific here, but it "seems to me" that vaporizing during the day in the 50deg F range, with nights near freezing should give optimum exposure of the oxalic particle coating to the mites due to tight clustering, rubbing, and movement. The bees get coated in the micro crystals, then cluster tightly overnight. How can the mites avoid exposure? Inquiring minds want to know......
 

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You want the OA to get to the bees. Most of the surface area in the hive is bees, because they are fuzzy.
So you want the bees to not be in a cluster, so they are exposed to the OA.

40F is normally considered to be the outside temperature above which the bees will break cluster, but the actual temperature depends on the size of the colony, the degree of insulation of the hive, and the race of bees.

I don't think that it will do any harm to apply OAV when the bees are in cluster, but it won't likely do much good either.

Beware! This is all armchair science. It makes sense to me, and it is what I would do. But you need to decide what you will do.
 

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Sam Ramsey has discovered that Varroa mites are evolving a smaller species of Varroa and they are able to tuck under the abdominal plates of the bees better avoiding any contact treatments. He also discovered that the mites can hold their breath for up to 2 hours avoiding the higher concentrations as well. Us beekeepers need to start evolving faster then the mites!
Beekeepers, apiculture and the entire industry need more Samual Ramsey types.
He presented at the Oregon State Beekeepers Association Fall conference this year.
His brilliance, knowledge and urgency are a model of what our industry needs BADLY!
And aside from him, Urgency is the thing MOST LACKING in much of our industry's "research".
 

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Sam Ramsey has discovered that Varroa mites are evolving a smaller species of Varroa and they are able to tuck under the abdominal plates of the bees better avoiding any contact treatments. He also discovered that the mites can hold their breath for up to 2 hours avoiding the higher concentrations as well. Us beekeepers need to start evolving faster then the mites!
The method of oxalic acid damage to Varroa has not been confirmed as breathing, has it? Fairly recently Randy Oliver's best guess is that it is through the mucous surface of the mites feet. An unsphinctered duct to the feet supplies the moisture.

I thought the case was that mites had evolved their flat profile, not that there was active ongoing movement in direction. I have not read Ramsey's work on this recently so perhaps there has been updates.
 
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