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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I did a formic Pro treatment in September and at the end of the treatment I counted 21 mites on the sticky board. Last Wed. when it was 60 degrees, I did a OAV treatment with my wand vaporizer. Three days later I checked the sticky board and counted 392 dead mites. I want to hit them again next week and it's supposed to be about 47 *F but is that warm enough to do the treatment ? What is the recommended temperature?
Also, while I am at it, I want to add that now have a sugar board with sugar block and winter pattie and a quilt box in place and I feel it will be to cold to remove the sugar board ad quilt box so I am not sure how the OA will effect supplement feed.
 

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Right now,one hive consisting of two 10 frame deeps of an Ohio swarm of muttsutts.
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I stuck a temp probe into one of my insulated colonies when the temp outside was ~ freezing and I got 68F above the cluster and 45 F. a few inches inside the lower entrance. Outside air temperature can be rather unimportant.
Looking at it that way,it sure makes much sense.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Certainly not less than 45 or so. Especially if using a wand vaporizer which doesn't get above the 1st box. 50s or 60s would be better with those ones.
That is good to know.
 

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Generally speaking, I pick the warmest day possible.

My vaporizer doesn't go above the 1st box, so if I choose anything other than the warmest day it's not going to be effective.

The warm days may also convince the bees to fan it around and help circulate the OAV.
 

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Generally speaking, I pick the warmest day possible.

My vaporizer doesn't go above the 1st box, so if I choose anything other than the warmest day it's not going to be effective.

The warm days may also convince the bees to fan it around and help circulate the OAV.
Dont put it into the bottom box then. Discharge into the top box or as johno has posted, between boxes. If you have wrappings or insulation on, cut out a window and drill a small hole. It is a few degrees above freezing this morning but I can guarantee my bees would instantly fan the snot out of OAV!
 

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I know there's a lot of people with more experience and knowledge than me, but I try to do any OAV above 50F and below 85F. Of course that doesn't always work out but I have concerns about breaking cluster when its cold and getting more activity than one might want. I insulate and most of my hive have full sun during the winter so I may have higher temps in the box. I had read that when the bees are in tight clusters in the colder weather, OAV on effects the out layer (older bees) and doesn't get into the middle (younger bees) where mites are hiding out. I have a couple of Varrox wands and a ProVap-pretty much use the ProVap exclusively and lend out the Varrox at this point. Of course what do I know?
 

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I think that the reference to suitable temperatures is taking for granted that uninsulated wooden hives are what is being considered. Etienne Tardiff mentions like something like ten C. degrees beflow freezing before bees cluster in well insulated hives. Being clustered or not being clusterd is the controlling factor unless I am mistaken but it seems obvious that a lot of focus is on the temperature surrounding the hive, not the temperature surrounding the bees. If your colonies are wrapped and insulated the bees wont be clustered for a quite a while yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I think that the reference to suitable temperatures is taking for granted that uninsulated wooden hives are what is being considered. Etienne Tardiff mentions like something like ten C. degrees beflow freezing before bees cluster in well insulated hives. Being clustered or not being clusterd is the controlling factor unless I am mistaken but it seems obvious that a lot of focus is on the temperature surrounding the hive, not the temperature surrounding the bees. If your colonies are wrapped and insulated the bees wont be clustered for a quite a while yet.
And yes. My hive is insulated with a Bee Cozy winter wrap.
 

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I do not know your location, but if you are North of me your hives could be broodless and if so a treatment would drop many mites as they are all vulnerable to treatment at this stage. This makes mite sampling a guessing game, when you have lots of brood you may only get 3 mites but when you have no brood you could get 30 mites in the sample which gives you a fright but is of the same value as the first sample with brood. So now is the time to get your mites as low as pssible so that they no longer can feed on your winter bees and you can start off in the spring with few mites.
 

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Dont know where you are username,but it sure aint been warm around here in the Northern Neck of Virginia. most of my stuff has cut back on brood and a lot are broodless already.
 

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Nothing scientific here, but it "seems to me" that vaporizing during the day in the 50deg F range, with nights near freezing should give optimum exposure of the oxalic particle coating to the mites due to tight clustering, rubbing, and movement. The bees get coated in the micro crystals, then cluster tightly overnight. How can the mites avoid exposure? Inquiring minds want to know......
 

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Johno, UN is in the northeast...!
Most of our colonies have a small patch of brood or less. I know this because I sample some in the yard that look average to make sure honey stores are on track (if no more brood being reared then the honey is static until mid Jan here. If more brood being raised they may still starve out...). I was in a yard 4 days ago and one colony had drones coming and going. So I thought there are issues as most colonies kicked out the drones 2 months ago. So I checked brood chamber. There is the 2021 Sam Comfort queen laying up a (comparatively) sizeable brood nest. No issues found. Will check again later to see if they need more honey.... Lows have been in 20sF, Thursday got up to 60F but mostly highs are in 40s with a few days not getting out of 30s. I would assume to be brood less at this point but there can be outliers....
With that much brood I can't really see calling them clustered, no insulation yet. So a brood less treatment of OA would not have the desired effect bow. I would say go ahead and use the OA but don't expect a single treatment to get all mites. Easy enough to do a few more treatments after until your drop drops....
 
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