Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I live in central Kansas, just north of Wichita. I am trying to learn about white clover and its characteristics. Last year we planted about an acre of white clover a few feet from our two hives. So this year (2nd season) was the first year the clover was in full bloom-90%. Not sure about the variety, but it grew about 6 to 8 inches tall. Taller in some areas. How many times should I mow it during the summer to stimulate the bees? I've also had black walnut trees close by, but took them down. Would that bother the clover? During bloom I saw very little bees working the clover. So tell me why would they fly over my clover to forage else where? What am I not doing right? How about soil content? Any information on white clover would be greatly appreciated.

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
I can tell you how we work it here in Pa around where I live, when the deer stop coming to the clover we cut it, I use a zero turn set 6" hi, good luck
 

·
Vendor
Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
Joined
·
54,120 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,869 Posts
We mow it to 6 inches regularly when it isnt too dry. Sometimes it seems as if you are taking all the the blooms, the next morning it is a white carpet. My bees use it alot when whatever else they were working slows down. Using it almost exclusively here now. Stay off it with equipment when it is very dry, especially in the first year. White Dutch by the way, know nothing about sweet clover. Good Luck. G
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
I planted between the raised beds of my garden in ladino clover instead of grass, for the bees and nitrogen fixation. I've noticed that the clover does really well near the beds, but in the center where the traffic is heavier vining grasses prevail. When I mow the clover I either cut it with a trimmer and just take off the blooms, or I mow it very high. I can imagine that clover is much like other flowers in the garden and deadheading is better than cutting gthe whole plant down. I've gotten about 4 or 5 good blooms out of it, and it's on its second year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So you cut it more than once during the summer? At what point then do you decide to mow it? This is all good information. Thank you all!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
477 Posts
I planted my entire lawn in white clover. I think grass is a waste of time and energy. When it is done blooming I mow it, it then blooms a little bit more, and the deer prefer the newer clover for fall feed anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
156 Posts
I have acres and acres of available, both on my property and the farms around me, but the bees are not working it...I think it hasn't been hot enough here for long enough to make it produce nectar. Instead, they keep trying to rob each other. :pinch:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,869 Posts
So you cut it more than once during the summer? At what point then do you decide to mow it? This is all good information. Thank you all!
If the weather permits, meaning it isnt too dry we will cut weekly, we have acres planted for the deer and turkeys. Like M. Bush said, once the heads start to turn, mow and it will replenish. The first year of a planting is very important to keep cut in my opinion. It helps to send the energy back to the roots, to take a good strong hold instead of wasting energy on seed production. A good strong stand of white clover can last many years with proper care. Good Luck. G
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Clover sure is prettier than grass especially in the spring. It starts growing earlier, and it blooms. Are the seeds viable when the flower heads turn brown?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
You can check for seeds by shaking the heads into your hand/a piece of paper. I think they have to get fairly brown for the seeds to ripen but have never checked white clover (red clover yes, since we used to combine nice stands in the fall to collect seed).
I have lots of white clover - the bees are all over it now. Cut it in strips later in the day so that the bees always have something to forage on. The clover will last into late Sept here since we tend to get rain on a weekly, or more often, basis + it isn't scorching hot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
Following a drought, most of my yard is now dutch clover. I would like to purchase seed and make my entire yard clover, as well as my back pasture/hillside where I have my hives. Around 5 acres total. Can anyone who has seeded clover into existing cover (grass, thistle, Johnson grass, fescue, etc) give advice as to the proper procedure? Can I just spread the seed onto the existing covered area? Sorry to hijack, but it seems pertinent to the OP's situation, too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,869 Posts
Following a drought, most of my yard is now dutch clover. I would like to purchase seed and make my entire yard clover, as well as my back pasture/hillside where I have my hives. Around 5 acres total. Can anyone who has seeded clover into existing cover (grass, thistle, Johnson grass, fescue, etc) give advice as to the proper procedure? Can I just spread the seed onto the existing covered area? Sorry to hijack, but it seems pertinent to the OP's situation, too.
It may work, but, try Frost seeding. thats how we overseed. it works well. Good Luck. Grass is clovers enemy, eventually strangling it out. If you want all clover there are products that kill grass but not clover. G

http://www.outreachoutdoors.com/foodplots/clover/frost-seeding-clover/
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top