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#2 wick should be more than large enough. In fact that size of wick should smoke with that size of candle. That is a votive wick. I am inclined to think the wax might contain honey or pollen that is clogging the wick
Do you still have a block from that batch of wax? Split it with an axe. If it is matted finish, should have no problem with honey. However, if it has a shiney, crystalized look to it, you have honey in your wax. You will need to boil the wax with water and then cool to allow to separate.

As for the pollen, you might need to strain it through several (8-10) layers of used honey straining cloth. If separating does not work, you might have to melt the block, pour into a rubbermaid dish pan, and add boiling water. Then let cool in a warm place.
The idea behind this is, the water will keep the wax hotter longer, allowing the pollen to separate between the water and the wax layer. Once it is completely cool, remove from the tub and scrape the debris off the bottom
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Honey: It burns great for the first hour and then the flame goes down a lot.

I do plan to get another presto pot so I can put a filter at the end of the spigot of one pot, melt the wax, and then the clean wax goes into another presto pot.

Do you think a coffee filter would work to get clean wax?
 

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If there is honey in the wax, you can not filtre it out. You need to find out if there is honey in your wax. Your issue sounds like a clogged wick.
If you want, post a pic of your wax in block and in liquid form.
Do you process your own wax?
 

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before you do anything, have you split your block of wax and looked at it?

As for your other candles, I have no idea. But what you describe is a clogged wick or a wick to small. And if you are using a #2 in your tea light, a wick that is actually too large for a tealight, the wick is clogging for some reason.
I went through the same problems when i first started out. After consulting a beeswax supplier and picking their brain...all the way to the top of the company, it was decided that honey is still present in the wax. We came to that conclusion because i already took care of the pollen, and because the consistency of the wax in block form.

When you get to the bottom of your wax melting pot, what is is the bottom? Is the bottom clean, or is there some gunk?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
gunk meaning black stuff? If so, yes. However, I thought that it would be ok because it just settles to the bottom.

I cant recall the wax (not at the honey house until later). Perhaps I will take a picture of it. It doesnt look shiney (from what I rememeber) but I could be totally wrong.
 

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I would think that a coffee filter will not work.
A 80 to 100 mesh cloth should work.
Some gas funnels have a very fine screen inside and that might work.
Good Luck,
Ernie
 

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When you check the block, make sure you split it. You will not see alot from the outside.
Now the black stuff. Is it like a thin layer of grains of sand, really fine? That is pollen. If it is like a pool, be it thin or thick that is honey. Simillar to a pool of oil in the bottom of a measuring cup with water on top. It moves by it self, stays together. That is honey. If that is in the bottom of your pot, there are two ways to get it out.

1. remelt your wax with water, let it boil for a minute then let it settle for several hours under low heat...like i said before

2. depending on your pouring pot...the spout being higher than at the bottom of the pot. For example, the pour spout of your presto pot is say, 1 - 1.5 inches above the bottom. Then you need to add say 3/4" of water to the pot. Honey is heavier than water. Your only problem then would be to give it time to settle before you pour your candles, and that the level of black stuff will not go above the spout. As well you will not want that water to boil, just be hot.

google you tube. Search how to make beeswax candles. John pluta has a video there where he is melting wax. That dirt in the bottom....you do not want that when pourin a candle. The blocks of wax for him is good enough. For me, i find that my candles will not work if the wax looks like that. For him, those candles work. For me, and my type of wax, that wax does not work, the wick will not burn...i can not get a good candle from that type of wax.
Then u tube honeyshack...the second wax video shows how my wax looks after cleaning the cappings. For me that is the only wax i can make a good candle from.

I mean no disrespect to him. Absolutely none. Each area where wax comes from has different burn properties. For John, it works. For me it does not. You need to find what works for you chef.

Even after processing my wax, i will still split the odd block from a batch of wax to make sure that the wax is clean. It is important for me to start will good quality wax, to ensure a good quality candle for a customer....I will even split the odd candle to ensure i am pouring a good candle...for me those are my quality control standards.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
is this the honeyshack video? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldDffohL5Jg The only one I could find.

I have Seen Johns video and I just rewatched it. Our wax doesnt look like that at the bottom. that is pretty dirty. I clean the presto pot out once a week and there is not much on the bottom at all.

If I were to boil it with water, just place wax and water in a pot, boil for a few minutes, and then let cool, right? Just let it cool on the top of the stove?
 
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