Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
846510AB-9C4D-4B7F-BF60-B47887497034.jpeg 970BD234-2732-4D79-B764-D5C48F91A782.jpeg 1C7102FA-17C3-4BE2-BB85-3FDFA99EA10C.jpeg Hi all, our packages was installed two weeks ago. I have been feeding 1:1 they are drinking a quart a day. They are working on drawing out the 11th bar. Should I continue to feed? Also is it time to give them a few more bars? I plan on doing an Inspection later today.just finished with inspection. First 4 bars are about A third of the way drawn out. There is clear liquid in the cells of the top of one of them. Are they storing the sugar water?Bars 5-8 are fully drawn and have brood and pollen on them. Only a little capped honey on them. 9-11 are mostly drawn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Hi all, our packages was installed two weeks ago. I have been feeding 1:1 they are drinking a quart a day. They are working on drawing out the 11th bar. Should I continue to feed? Also is it time to give them a few more bars? I plan on doing an Inspection later today
Might as well pretend I know what I'm talking about given most definitely new to this world. I am a touched confused about giving them a few more bars since we have empty bars on the hive all the time but will sometimes move an empty one intentionally in front, behind, or sometimes between two brood combs IF it looks like things might be getting honey bound. Since it seems you are in the SE part of the U.S. I am assuming honey flow is in fully swing still, by a lot. When you check the hive, big focus should be on fresh brood, either capped, eggs, or larvae without mega drone cells. That can help confirm your queen is doing it's thing balancing workers with drones, but don't ask me how many drones relative to workers is a good ratio. If you've got that many bars solidly going AND the flow is on AND you can observe foraging bees actively returning with pollen, I probably would stop feeding all things equal and start whatever mite protocols you are or will be using. How many bars total can your hive accommodate? Winter feeding here in the PNW with our top bar hives is always a bit of a challenge...do you have a plan for that come winter?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Might as well pretend I know what I'm talking about given most definitely new to this world. I am a touched confused about giving them a few more bars since we have empty bars on the hive all the time but will sometimes move an empty one intentionally in front, behind, or sometimes between two brood combs IF it looks like things might be getting honey bound. Since it seems you are in the SE part of the U.S. I am assuming honey flow is in fully swing still, by a lot. When you check the hive, big focus should be on fresh brood, either capped, eggs, or larvae without mega drone cells. That can help confirm your queen is doing it's thing balancing workers with drones, but don't ask me how many drones relative to workers is a good ratio. If you've got that many bars solidly going AND the flow is on AND you can observe foraging bees actively returning with pollen, I probably would stop feeding all things equal and start whatever mite protocols you are or will be using. How many bars total can your hive accommodate? Winter feeding here in the PNW with our top bar hives is always a bit of a challenge...do you have a plan for that come winter?
Might as well pretend I know what I'm talking about given most definitely new to this world. I am a touched confused about giving them a few more bars since we have empty bars on the hive all the time but will sometimes move an empty one intentionally in front, behind, or sometimes between two brood combs IF it looks like things might be getting honey bound. Since it seems you are in the SE part of the U.S. I am assuming honey flow is in fully swing still, by a lot. When you check the hive, big focus should be on fresh brood, either capped, eggs, or larvae without mega drone cells. That can help confirm your queen is doing it's thing balancing workers with drones, but don't ask me how many drones relative to workers is a good ratio. If you've got that many bars solidly going AND the flow is on AND you can observe foraging bees actively returning with pollen, I probably would stop feeding all things equal and start whatever mite protocols you are or will be using. How many bars total can your hive accommodate? Winter feeding here in the PNW with our top bar hives is always a bit of a challenge...do you have a plan for that come winter?
Thanks for the reply. we started with 10 bars then put a follower board in with feeder behind that. I inadvertently put an eleventh one in when I did first inspection. All that I have read is once they get the first ten about full move follower board back and give them more room. I am in NC. I did see lots of capped brood and a couple drone cells. Bees are very active bringing in pollen and I saw quite a few cells with pollen. I added to my previous post with what I saw today. As far as mites, what I have been reading is to treat in the fall. I’m still learning about the mite stuff. Pretty sure we have 23 bars. Winter plan is next on list to learn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,920 Posts
The first season with a topbar hive is all about getting as much brood comb drawn as possible. Pull the follower board. Insert 4 empty bars into the brood nest, alternating drawn and empty. Keep feeding. Once those 4 are drawn, do it again. At some point they will start drawing drone comb in the brood nest, but you want as much worker comb as possible. If you leave the empty bars always at the end of the comb structure, you likely get honey comb, not worker sized cells. The bees can always backfill brood comb with honey/syrup for winter stores but they cannot use honey comb sized cells to lay workers in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The first season with a topbar hive is all about getting as much brood comb drawn as possible. Pull the follower board. Insert 4 empty bars into the brood nest, alternating drawn and empty. Keep feeding. Once those 4 are drawn, do it again. At some point they will start drawing drone comb in the brood nest, but you want as much worker comb as possible. If you leave the empty bars always at the end of the comb structure, you likely get honey comb, not worker sized cells. The bees can always backfill brood comb with honey/syrup for winter stores but they cannot use honey comb sized cells to lay workers in.
Thank you. I will do that this weekend.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top